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by Charles M. Payne

Author: Charles M. Payne
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University of California Press (May 10, 1995)
Pages: 506 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: docx lit lrf mbr

Payne works hard to dispel the myth that your every day person isn’t powerful, and shows how people who come together can make change under the most hoary of circumstances. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom opens with in depth depictions of the systematic racial terrorism that blacks endured.

Payne works hard to dispel the myth that your every day person isn’t powerful, and shows how people who come together can make change under the most hoary of circumstances. Chapter One, duly titled Setting the stage goes into extreme detail of the lynchings that occurred in Mississippi between 1930 and 1950

Charles Payne's 'I've Got the Light of Freedom' reconstructs a history that holds a more accurate depiction of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. Thought it up, led it, produced its victories, became its sole martyr. Not only that, but Payne does a great job of really getting into what the nitty gritty of organizing was in the Mississippi Delta and all the accompanying dangers of such organizing.

Payne brilliantly brings to life the tradition of grassroots African American activism, long practiced yet poorly understood. Payne overturns familiar ideas about community activism in the 1960s

Payne brilliantly brings to life the tradition of grassroots African American activism, long practiced yet poorly understood. Payne overturns familiar ideas about community activism in the 1960s. The young organizers who were the engines of change in the state were not following any charismatic national leader. Far from being a complete break with the past, their work was based directly on the work of an older generation of activists, people like Ella Baker, Septima Clark, Amzie Moore, Medgar Evers, Aaron Henry

Home Browse Books Book details, I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Home Browse Books Book details, I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing. I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle.

Payne seems to have interviewed just about everyone from the civil rights movement in the Mississippi Delta (the book was first published in 1995) and sets out in huge detail the evolution of the movement from the end of World War Two to the late 60s. He uses that analysis to challenge. He uses that analysis to challenge conventional narratives and shed real light on a marvellous moment in US history. As one high school student put it, ‘One day, a nice old lady, Rosa Parks, sat down on a bus and got arrested.

First, Payne places the people who made the Mississippi movement at the center the story.

book by Charles M. Payne. This momentous work offers a groundbreaking history of the early civil rights movement in the South. First, Payne places the people who made the Mississippi movement at the center the story. He tells the story of both the original local leaders who made it possible for the civil rights movement to happen in Mississippi and the activists who followed their lead in the 1960s. Not only that, a description of how to organize from a working class, feminist perspective in the context of the African-American freedom struggle.

I must hurry and catch up to them for I am their leader

I must hurry and catch up to them for I am their leader.

This momentous work offers a groundbreaking history of the early civil rights movement in the South. Using wide-ranging archival work and extensive interviews with movement participants, Charles Payne uncovers a chapter of American social history forged locally, in places like Greenwood, Mississippi, where countless unsung African Americans risked their lives for the freedom struggle. The leaders were ordinary women and men—sharecroppers, domestics, high school students, beauticians, independent farmers—committed to organizing the civil rights struggle house by house, block by block, relationship by relationship. Payne brilliantly brings to life the tradition of grassroots African American activism, long practiced yet poorly understood.Payne overturns familiar ideas about community activism in the 1960s. The young organizers who were the engines of change in the state were not following any charismatic national leader. Far from being a complete break with the past, their work was based directly on the work of an older generation of activists, people like Ella Baker, Septima Clark, Amzie Moore, Medgar Evers, Aaron Henry. These leaders set the standards of courage against which young organizers judged themselves; they served as models of activism that balanced humanism with militance. While historians have commonly portrayed the movement leadership as male, ministerial, and well-educated, Payne finds that organizers in Mississippi and elsewhere in the most dangerous parts of the South looked for leadership to working-class rural Blacks, and especially to women. Payne also finds that Black churches, typically portrayed as frontrunners in the civil rights struggle, were in fact late supporters of the movement.