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by Anthony DePalma

Author: Anthony DePalma
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: PublicAffairs; Annotated edition edition (April 24, 2006)
Pages: 328 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: rtf docx mbr txt

In 1957, Herbert . atthews of the New York Times . There he interviewed a young lawyer, Fidel Castro, who had landed in Cuba several months earlier with the intention of waging guerrilla warfare to overthrow the Batista regime

In 1957, Herbert . atthews of the New York Times, then considered one of the premiere foreign correspondents of his time. There he interviewed a young lawyer, Fidel Castro, who had landed in Cuba several months earlier with the intention of waging guerrilla warfare to overthrow the Batista regime. Cuban government officials had claimed that Castro was dead and that the rebels had been obliterated. But Matthews' interview confirmed that Castro and his movement survived. Furthermore, Matthews conveyed Castro's plans for a democratic, non-Communist revolution, which earned him the sympathy of many Americans from both political parties.

Matthews, Herbert Lionel, 1900-, Castro, Fidel, 1926-, Journalists. New York : Public Affairs. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Born in New York in 1900, Matthews barely missed combat in World War I and thought about becoming an academic.

The Man Who Invented Fidel:Castro, Cuba, and Herbert L. Matthews of The New York Times. 308 pp. PublicAffairs. And, as we learn in Anthony DePalma's fascinating and admirably dispassionate book "The Man Who Invented Fidel," today's tussles over the "liberal media" in general, and The New York Times in particular, are merely an extension of an old story from the precomputer age - a story that helped create Castro and, even now, illuminates the enduring power of bias and myth. Born in New York in 1900, Matthews barely missed combat in World War I and thought about becoming an academic.

Matthews Interviews Fidel Castro: The New York Times sent Herbert Matthews to interview Fidel Castro. Matthews and his wife Nancie flew to Cuba, pretending to be on holiday, so Batista would not suspect them. In February 1957, in the Sierra Maestra Mountains, Herbert Matthews interviewed rebel leader Fidel Castro for three hours, in Spanish. Matthews even got his picture taken with Fidel Castro, proving that Castro was still alive. The newspaper published three front-page articles based on the interview.

In 1959, Fidel Castro said of New York Times correspondent Herbert L. Matthews . The first part of the title of this

In 1959, Fidel Castro said of New York Times correspondent Herbert L. Matthews (1900-. 1977): I am sick and tired of that old man who thinks he is my father. He is always giving me. advice. Anthony DePalma, senior correspondent for the Times, wrote this biography of one of. his newspaper’s most pompous and controversial correspondents. The author has relied largely. The first part of the title of this. Matthews was born and raised in New York City’s affluent Riverside Drive in the Upper.

President Fulgencio Batista claimed publicly that the young guerilla leader had been killed during the landing of the yacht Granma, bringing him and others back to Cuba from Mexico in December 1956.

In the chill early hours of December 17, 1957, New York Times reporter Herbert L. Matthews interviewed rebel leader . In this book, current Times reporter Anthony DePalma has written a riveting narrative about Matthews' controversial career. Matthews interviewed rebel leader Fidel Castro in a clearing in the Sierra Maestra. The regime of Cuban President Fulgencio Batista claimed to have killed the bearded insurgent in a skirmish the previous year, so Matthews's scoop resurrected Castro from the dead. Indeed, many claim that Matthews' romanticized portrait of the rebel leader made possible Castro's unlikely rise to power.

DePalma, Anthony 2006 The Man Who Invented Fidel: Castro, Cuba, and Herbert L. The significance of Ruby Phillips a reporter far more experienced and attuned to the Cuban circumstance that Matthews is well described

Anthony DePalma was the first foreign correspondent of The New York . The image created by Matthews stuck, helping Castro consolidate his power and gain international recognition.

Anthony DePalma was the first foreign correspondent of The New York Times to serve as bureau chief in both Mexico and Canada. Matthews, clearly taken by the young rebel’s charms, and sympathetic to his cause, presented a skewed picture.

Download The Man Who Invented Fidel: Castro, Cuba, and Herbert L. Matthews of The New York Times PDF. Norma Craig.

In 1957, Herbert L.Matthews of the New York Times, then considered one of the premiere foreign correspondents of his time, tracked down Fidel Castro in Cuba's Sierra Maestra mountains and returned with what was considered the scoop of the century. His heroic portrayal of Castro, who was then believed dead, had a powerful effect on American perceptions of Cuba, both in and out of the government, and profoundly influenced the fall of the Batista regime. When Castro emerged as a Soviet-backed dictator, Matthews became a scapegoat; his paper turned on him, his career foundered, and he was accused of betraying his country. In this fascinating book, New York Times reporter DePalma investigates the Matthews case to reveal how it contains the story not just of one newspaperman but of an age, not just how Castro came to power but how America determines who its enemies are. He re-creates the atmosphere of revolutionary Cuba and Cold War America, and clarifies the facts of Castro's ascension and political evolution from the many myths that have sprung up around them. Through a dramatic, ironic, in ways tragic story, The Man Who Invented Fidel offers provocative insights into Cuban politics, the Cuban-American relationship, and the many difficult balancing acts of responsible journalism.