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by George Lipsitz,David W. Noble

Author: George Lipsitz,David W. Noble
Subcategory: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press; First edition edition (2002)
Pages: 400 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.9
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In the 1940s, American thought experienced a cataclysmic paradigm shift

In the 1940s, American thought experienced a cataclysmic paradigm shift. Before then, national ideology was shaped by American exceptionalism and bourgeois nationalism: elites saw themselves as the children of a homogeneous nation standing outside the history and culture of the Old World. This view repressed the cultures of those who did not fit the elite vision: people of color.

eISBN: 978-0-8166-9440-2. Subjects: Political Science. David Noble is an original and generative thinker. For more than five decades, his writings have offered us unparalleled insights into the . nation and its collective imagination. Like most historians, he concerns himself with change over time, with what can be learned once we realize that part of what things are lies in how they came to be.

Death of a Nation book. In the 1940s, American thought experienced a cataclysmic paradigm. The academese is pretty thick and the book is probably more suitable to a graduate seminar in the American Studies Dept in which Noble taught, but if one is interested in the myth of "who we are" and how we got that way this volume will reward persistent effort. Copious notes and citations of other works, especially of more recent publication provide much grist for the mill of anyone wishing to grind out more particulars. Sep 02, 2009 Joseph Volk rated it it was amazing.

David W. Noble, a preeminent figure in American studies, inherited this ideology. Throughout his career, Noble has examined this rupture in American intellectual life. However, like many who entered the field in the 1940s, he rejected the ideals of his intellectual predecessors and sought a new, multicultural, post-national scholarship.

In the 1940s, American thought experienced a cataclysmic paradigm shift

In the 1940s, American thought experienced a cataclysmic paradigm shift. This view repressed the cultures of those who did not fit the elite vision: people of color, Catholics, Jews, and immigrants.

American exceptionalism is one of three related ideas. The first is that the history of the United States is inherently different from those of other nations.

American Culture and the End of Exceptionalism. Exploring the roots of American exceptionalism, Noble demonstrates that it was a doomed ideology

American Culture and the End of Exceptionalism. David W. However, like many who entered the field in the 1940s, he rejected the ideals of his intellectual predecessors and sought a new, multicultural, postnational scholarship. Exploring the roots of American exceptionalism, Noble demonstrates that it was a doomed ideology.

Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptionalism. In the 1940s, American thought experienced a cataclysmic paradigm shift.

GEORGE LIPSITZ The Unpredictable Creativity of David Noble, foreword to David W. Noble, Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptionalism.

Current Employment and Address: Professor Black Studies Department and Sociology Department University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 glipsitzkstudies. American Studies in a Moment of Danger (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2001). The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: How White People Profit From Identity Politics (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998). The Unpredictable Creativity of David Noble, foreword to David W. Noble, Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptionalism (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002), ix-xviii.

In the 1940s, American thought experienced a cataclysmic paradigm shift. Before then, national ideology was shaped by American exceptionalism and bourgeois nationalism: elites saw themselves as the children of a homogeneous nation standing outside the history and culture of the Old World. This view repressed the cultures of those who did not fit the elite vision: people of color, Catholics, Jews, and immigrants. David W. Noble, a preeminent figure in American studies, inherited this ideology. However, like many who entered the field in the 1940s, he rejected the ideals of his intellectual predecessors and sought a new, multicultural, post-national scholarship. Throughout his career, Noble has examined this rupture in American intellectual life. In Death of a Nation, he presents the culmination of decades of thought in a sweeping treatise on the shaping of contemporary American studies and an eloquent summation of his distinguished career.

Exploring the roots of American exceptionalism, Noble demonstrates that it was a doomed ideology. Capitalists who believed in a bounded nationalism also depended on a boundless, international marketplace. This contradiction was inherently unstable, and the belief in a unified national landscape exploded in World War II. The rupture provided an opening for alternative narratives as class, ethnicity, race, and region were reclaimed as part of the nation's history. Noble traces the effects of this shift among scholars and artists, and shows how even today they struggle to imagine an alternative postnational narrative and seek the meaning of local and national cultures in an increasingly transnational world. While Noble illustrates the challenges thatthe paradigm shift created, he also suggests solutions that will help scholars avoid romanticized and reductive approaches toward the study of American culture in the future.