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by D. P. S. Peacock,Evan Peacock,Lucy Blue

Author: D. P. S. Peacock,Evan Peacock,Lucy Blue
Subcategory: Africa
Language: English
Publisher: Oxbow Books (November 15, 2007)
Pages: 145 pages
Category: History
Rating: 4.5
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The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity.

The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity. It is best known for its role in Aksumite trade during the fourth - seventh centuries AD. However it is also a major port of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, a sailors' hand-book of the first century AD. Not only did it offer a good harbour on the route to India, but it was a source for luxuries such as The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity.

by D. P. S. Peacock (Author), Evan Peacock (Author), Lucy Blue (Author) & 0 more. The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity

by D. The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity. Not only did it offer a good harbour on the route to India, but it was a source for luxuries such as ivory, tortoise-shell and rhinoceros horn. The site was first identified by Henry Salt, in 1810, but there have always been a number of problems, both chronological and topographical, with the identification.

The site of Adulis, on the Ethiopian Red Sea coast, may one day yield a Greek inscription .

The site of Adulis, on the Ethiopian Red Sea coast, may one day yield a Greek inscription of outstanding importance for the geographical history of ancient Ethiopia.

Figure . Map of the Red Sea area showing the location of Adulis.

David Peacock and Lucy Blue. We travelled the length of the country from Massawa to Assab examining volcanic rocks which may have been the source of basalt ships’ ballast found on Egyptian sites such as Quseir al-Qadim and Berenike (Peacock, Williams and James 2007). Figure .

P. Peacock (Author); Evan Peacock (Author); Lucy Blue (Author) . Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, by an unknown author, with some extracts from Agatharkhidés 'On the Erythraean Sea' (translated and G. W. B. Huntingford, e. London: Hakluyt Society, 1980. Peacock, Lucy Katherine Blue, Jillian Phillips. Published December 31, 2007 by Oxbow Books Limited. Commerce, Excavations (Archaeology), Antiquities, Harbors, History. Eritrea, Aksum (Kingdom), Red Sea Coast (Eritrea). Peacock, Evan Peacock, Lucy Blue. The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea.

David M Peacock, Lucy Blue. David M Peacock, Lucy Blue. Between 2004 and 2008 the Centre for Maritime Archaeology (CMA), University of Southampton and the Department of Underwater Antiquities of the Egyptian Supreme Council for Antiquities (SCA), i. More). However it is also a major port of th.

The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity. It is best known for its role in Aksumite trade during the fourth - seventh centuries AD. However it is also a major port of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea , a sailors' hand-book of the first century AD. Not only did it offer a good harbour on the route to India, but it was a source for luxuries such as ivory, tortoise-shell and rhinoceros horn. The site was first identified by Henry Salt, in 1810, but there have always been a number of problems, both chronological and topographical, with the identification. Firstly, the surface pottery is late in date and accords with Aksumitic importance rather than the Roman. Secondly, Adulis is referred to as a port, but it is today 7 km from the sea. The Periplus refers to an island approached by a causeway, which suggested to some that the site was originally at Massawa, 60 km to the north, a town which today comprises islands connected by causeways. The work of Cosmas Indicopleustes, 'Christian Topography' written in the 6th Century AD, mentions two other places, Gabaza and Samidi, which have never been identified. The field work on which this book is based resolves these issues. It is suggested that Roman Adulis underlies the Aksumite city. Also the pottery and structures on the Galala hills to the south, show that this was almost certainly the site of Aksumite Gabaza. However, off the seaward end of the hills is a rock which would have been a small island in Roman times and on it was a scatter of 1st century AD Roman wine amphorae (Dressel 2-4). The Periplus tells us that ships used to moor of Diodorus Island which was connected to the mainland by a causeway, but was later moved to an island called Oreinê (hilly) for greater security. The latter can be none other than Dese which is the only hilly island in the area and on it field survey has located a fine harbour and an early Roman settlement. The remaining site, Samidi, has also been found, for 7 km north of Adulis are large stone mounds. Architectural fragments and fragments of human bone suggest that this may have been an impressive mausoleum, perhaps the burial place of the kings of Adulis.