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Download Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us) djvu

by Tom Vanderbilt

Author: Tom Vanderbilt
Subcategory: Psychology & Counseling
Language: English
Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (August 11, 2009)
Pages: 416 pages
Category: Fitness and Health
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi txt lit mbr

Are we not all driving the same road, did we not all pass the same driving tests? What was puzzling was not just the variety of responses but the .

Are we not all driving the same road, did we not all pass the same driving tests? What was puzzling was not just the variety of responses but the sense of moral righteousness each person attributed to his or her highway behavior, and the vitriol each person reserved for those holding the opposite view. For the most part, people were not citing traffic laws or actual evidence but their own personal sense of what was right. I even found someone claiming to have had a conversion experience exactly the opposite of mine.

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And why should you never drive with any beer-drinking, divorced doctors named Fred?Driving is about far more than . Driving is about far more than getting from A to B. As Tom Vanderbilt's brilliant, curiosity-filled book shows, it's actually the key to deciphering human nature and.

And why should you never drive with any beer-drinking, divorced doctors named Fred?Driving is about far more than getting from A to B. well, pretty much everything.

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Questions for Tom Vanderbilt, author of Traffic. Q: You say that, For most of us who are not brain surgeons, driving is probably the most complex everyday thing we do in our lives. Q: Was this book really born on a New Jersey highway?A: Yes, though it could have been any highway in the world, where countless drivers, driving on a crowded road that is about to lose a lane, have had to make a simple decision: When to merge.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 293-383) and index. Prologue : Why I became a late merger (and why you should too) - Why does the other lane always seem faster? How traffic messes with our heads. Shut up, I can't hear you : anonymity, aggression, and the problems of communicating while driving ; Are you lookin' at me? Eye contact, stereotypes, and social interaction on the road ; Waiting in line, waiting in traffic : why the other lane always moves faster ; Postscript : And now, the secrets of late merging revealed - Why you're not as good a driver as you think you.

Keep Your Mind on the Road: Why It’s So Hard to Pay Attention in Traffic.

Chapter 3. How Our Eyes and Minds Betray Us on the Road. Keep Your Mind on the Road: Why It’s So Hard to Pay Attention in Traffic. Any man who can drive safely while kissing a pretty girl is simply not giving the kiss the attention it deserves. Or we may change the way we drive-we speed up because driving does not seem overly taxing. To the extent that this keeps us in the middle of the Yerkes-Dodson curve, it’s a good thing.

Vanderbilt, who writes regularly about design and technology, cites a finding that 1. percent of the traffic slowdown after a crash has nothing to do with wreckage . percent of the traffic slowdown after a crash has nothing to do with wreckage blocking lanes; it’s caused by gawkers. Rubberneckers attend to the spectacle so avidly that they themselves then get into accidents, slamming into the car in front of them when it brakes to get a better look or dig out a cellphone. This happens often enough for traffic types to have coined a word for it: digi-necking.

A New York Times Notable BookOne of the Best Books of the YearThe Washington PostThe Cleveland Plain-DealerRocky Mountain NewsIn this brilliant, lively, and eye-opening investigation, Tom Vanderbilt examines the perceptual limits and cognitive underpinnings that make us worse drivers than we think we are. He demonstrates why plans to protect pedestrians from cars often lead to more accidents. He uncovers who is more likely to honk at whom, and why. He explains why traffic jams form, outlines the unintended consequences of our quest for safety, and even identifies the most common mistake drivers make in parking lots.Traffic is about more than driving: it's about human nature. It will change the way we see ourselves and the world around us, and it may even make us better drivers.