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by John E. Skvarla III,Frank Elliott

Author: John E. Skvarla III,Frank Elliott
Language: English
Publisher: Signal Books (March 1, 1994)
Category: Fitness and Health
Rating: 4.1
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Skvarla, John . 1948-; Elliott, Frank (Frank . Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

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That if we are honest with ourselves and listen quietly, that we all harbor one fiercely held aspiration for our healthcare: that it keep us healthy

That if we are honest with ourselves and listen quietly, that we all harbor one fiercely held aspiration for our healthcare: that it keep us healthy. This aspiration that our healthcare keep us healthy is an enormously powerful one. And the way I think about this is that healthcare is like any other system. It's just a set of choices that people make. And that not only leads to a better set of clinical choices, but the doctor can also prescribe those resources for the patient, using Health Leads like any other sub-specialty referral. The problem is, once you get a taste of what it's like to realize your aspiration for healthcare, you want more.

the people's prescription for what really ails America's health care system. Published 1994 by Signal Books in Carrboro, NC. Written in English. Health care reform, History, Medical care. There's no description for this book yet.

We know people who are like this in conversation, and it’s very hard to listen to somebody if you know that you’re being judged and found wanting at the same time. You can fall into this. My mother, in the last years of her life, became very very negative, and it’s hard to listen. I remember one day, I said to her, It’s October 1 today, and she said, I know, isn’t it dreadful? It’s hard to listen when somebody’s that negative. And another form of negativity, complaining. Well, this is the national art of the . It’s our national sport.

And I think that with nationalized health care, it will allow women to have coverage . But I think what we need is health insurance reform

And I think that with nationalized health care, it will allow women to have coverage to have children and then their children to be covered, in case, you know, the parents are unemployed or something happens in the family. I think that what you're talking about is less information or less responsibility put on the government, and more on healthcare being responsible, or the insurance being responsible. But I think what we need is health insurance reform. We need to make sure that the insurance companies aren't as powerful as they are, that they do have more liberal rules and guidelines.

The national income is there, the medical institutions to provide that care are there, and the risk pools could easily be made large enough to make the system solvent.

But that must not distract from the profound evil revealed by this story. The national income is there, the medical institutions to provide that care are there, and the risk pools could easily be made large enough to make the system solvent. The fact that ObamaCare - a reasonably good-faith effort to make the system better - did not stop the vicious cruelty of medical billing, and in many ways only added to the system's psychotic complexity, ought to weigh on us all.

Book by III, John E. Skvarla, Elliott, Frank