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by Vassiliki Panoussi

Author: Vassiliki Panoussi
Subcategory: Poetry
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (March 23, 2009)
Pages: 272 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi azw mbr lrf

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Vergil's "Aeneid" and Greek Tragedy : Ritual, Empire, and Intertext. Vassiliki Panoussi argues that the epic's representation of ritual acts, especially sacrifice, mourning, marriage, and maenadic rites, mobilizes a connection to tragedy. by Vassiliki Panoussi.

The tragic-ritual model offers a fresh look into the political and cultural function This is the first systematic study of the importance of Greek tragedy as a fundamental "intertext" for Vergil's Aeneid. The tragic-ritual model offers a fresh look into the political and cultural function of the Aeneid, expanding our awareness of the poem's scope, particularly in relation to gender, and presenting new.

She is also interested in the study of women and gender in antiquity and in Greco-Roman religion. She is the author of Greek Tragedy in Vergil's Aeneid: Ritual, Empire, and Intertext (Cambridge University Press 2009) and Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's rituals in Roman Literature (Johns Hopkins University Press 2019). She has taught a range of courses on Greek and Roman literature and culture and all levels of Greek and Latin.

ritual, empire, and intertext. Ritual violence and the failure of sacrifice. Suicide, devotio and ritual closure. The fragility of reconciliation : ritual restoration and the divine. Maenad brides and the destruction of the city. Mourning glory : ritual lament and Roman civic identity. Heroic identity : Vergil's Ajax. Contesting ideologies. Includes bibliographical references and index.

This book is a systematic study of the importance of Greek tragedy as a fundamental 'intertext' for Vergil's Aeneid.

Greek Tragedy in Vergil's Aeneid: Ritual, Empire, and Intertext. Greek Tragedy in Vergil's "Aeneid". Cambridge University Press.

Greek tragedy in Vergil's Aeneid : Ritual, empire, and intertext. Vassiliki Panoussi argues that the epic's representation of ritual acts, especially sacrifice, mourning, marriage, and maenadic rites, mobilises a connection to tragedy

Greek tragedy in Vergil's Aeneid : Ritual, empire, and intertext. Vassiliki Panoussi argues that the epic's representation of ritual acts, especially sacrifice, mourning, marriage, and maenadic rites, mobilises a connection to tragedy. The tragic-ritual model offers a fresh look into the political and cultural function of the Aeneid, expanding our awareness of the poem's scope, particularly in relation to gender, and presenting new readings of celebrated episodes, such as Anchises’ games, Amata's maenadic rites, Dido's suicide, and the killing of Turnus.

This is the first systematic study of the importance of Greek tragedy as a fundamental "intertext" for Vergil's Aeneid. Vassiliki Panoussi argues that the epic's representation of ritual acts, especially sacrifice, mourning, marriage, and maenadic rites, mobilizes a connection to tragedy. The tragic-ritual model offers a fresh look into the political and cultural function of the Aeneid, expanding our awareness of the poem's scope, particularly in relation to gender, and presenting new readings of celebrated episodes, such as Anchises' games, Amata's maenadic rites, Dido's suicide, and the killing of Turnus. Panoussi offers a new argument for the epic's ideological function beyond pro- and anti-Augustan readings. She interprets the Aeneid as a work that reflects the dynamic nature of Augustan ideology, contributing to the redefinition of civic discourse and national identity. In her rich study, readers will find a unique exploration of the complex relationship between Greek tragedy and Vergil's Aeneid and a stimulating discussion of problems of gender, power, and ideology in ancient Rome.