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by Patrick Phillips

Author: Patrick Phillips
Subcategory: Poetry
Language: English
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press (July 1, 2004)
Pages: 80 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf txt doc lrf

Winner of the 2005 Kate Tufts Discovery Award Chattahoochee: Poems (Ka. .has been added to your Cart.

Winner of the 2005 Kate Tufts Discovery Award. From the author of Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America and the National Book Award finalist Elegy for a Broken Machine: Poems has been added to your Cart. From the author of Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America and the National Book Award finalist Elegy for a Broken Machine: Poems, here is the first collection from award-winning poet Patrick Phillips. A river runs through Patrick Phillips’s collection Chattahoochee, and through a family saga as powerful and poignant as tfinalist Elegy. Winner of the 2005 Kate Tufts Discovery Award. From the author of Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America and the National Book Award finalist Elegy for a Broken Machine: Poems, here is the first. A river runs through Patrick Phillips’s collection Chattahoochee, and through a family saga as powerful and poignant as the landscape in which it unfolds. Here are tales of a vanished South, elegies for the lost, and glimpses of what Flannery O’Connor called the action of grace in territory held largely by the devil.

Items related to Chattahoochee: Poems (Kate Tufts Discovery Award). A river runs through Patrick Phillips’s collection Chattahoochee, and through a family saga as powerful and poignant as the landscape in which it unfolds

Items related to Chattahoochee: Poems (Kate Tufts Discovery Award). Phillips, Patrick Chattahoochee: Poems (Kate Tufts Discovery Award). ISBN 13: 9781557287755. Chattahoochee: Poems (Kate Tufts Discovery Award).

Its counterpart, the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, is given to a poet who demonstrates genuine promise in their first book of published poetry . Michael Ryan - New and Selected Poems. Patrick Phillips - Chattahoochee. Henri Cole - Middle Earth.

Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. The Kate Tufts Discovery Award.

Chattahoochee : Poems. Patrick Phillips has won a "Discovery", The Nation Award from the Unterberg Poetry Center of the 92nd Street Y, a Gulf Coast Poetry Prize, and was a finalist for the National Poetry Series. A past Fulbright Fellow, he has held fellowships at the MacDowell and Millay colonies.

Patrick Phillips - Patrick Phillips was born in 1970 in Atlanta and raised in.

Patrick Phillips - Patrick Phillips was born in 1970 in Atlanta and raised in the Appalachian foothills of north Georgia. His other honors include the Kate Tufts Discovery Award from Claremont Graduate University, a Discovery/The Nation Prize from the 92nd Street Y, a Pushcart Prize, the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Kate Tufts Discovery Award is a counterpart to the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, and is awarded to a newly published poet. 2010-Beth Bachmann, Temper. 2009-Matthew Dickman, All-American Poem. 2008-Janice N. Harrington, Even the Hollow My Body Made is Gone. 2007-Eric McHenry, Potscrubber Lullabies. 2006-Christian Hawkey, The Book of Funnels. 2005-Patrick Phillips, Chattahoochee. 2004-Adrian Blevins, The Brass Girl Brouhaha.

Winner of the 2005 Kate Tufts Discovery Award. From the author of Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America and the National Book Award finalist Elegy for a Broken Machine: Poems, here is the first collection from award-winning poet Patrick Phillips. A river runs through Patrick Phillips’s collection Chattahoochee, and through a family saga as powerful and poignant as the landscape in which it unfolds. Here are tales of a vanished South, elegies for the lost, and glimpses of what Flannery O’Connor called the “action of grace in territory held largely by the devil.” In language delicate and muscular, tender and raw-boned, Phillips writes of family, place, and that mythic conjunction of the two we call home.