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by Walter Lew,Frances Chung

Author: Walter Lew,Frances Chung
Subcategory: Poetry
Language: English
Publisher: Wesleyan; 1st edition (December 18, 2000)
Pages: 189 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr docx lrf txt

Series Title: Wesleyan Poetry.

Series Title: Wesleyan Poetry. Publisher: Wesleyan University Press. Street Date: December 18, 2000. Chung's form owes much to William Carlos Williams; many of her poems are compact and oddly moving narratives that give voice to those who are between cultures. wrote tersely and elliptically about milieu and with laudable impersonality about events in her own life. She never ranted, but made her points with carefully selected details and bold irony.

As a young Chinese American woman wedged in between the worlds of New York City and Chinatown, Chung’s speaker not only engages in this questioning while moving outward from Chinatown into the rest of the world, but she also compels her reader to question what definitions they assume as given along the way.

Frances Chung's poetry stands alone as the most perceptive, aesthetically accomplished, and compassionate depiction of a supposedly impenetrable community during the late 1960s and 70s. Written For the Chinatown People. Written For the Chinatown People and imprinted with Chung's own ink seal.

Frances Chung's poetry stands alone as the most perceptive, aesthetically . Published December 18th 2000 by Wesleyan University Press. Written "For the Chinatown People" and imprinted with Chung's own ink seal, Crazy Melon is collects brief poems and prose vignettes set in New York's Chinatown and Lower East Side. Chung incorporates Spanish and Chinese into her English in deft evocations of these neighborhoods' streets, fantasies, commerce, and toil.

Wesleyan University/. 'Yo vivo en el barrio Chino,'' Frances Chung announces in the opening line of her posthumous (and first) collection of poems. The line is like much of her work - direct in voice and intensely personal in subject matter.

Get this from a library! Crazy melon and Chinese apple : the .

Get this from a library! Crazy melon and Chinese apple : the poems of Frances Chung. Frances Chung's poetry stands alone as the most perceptive, aesthetically accomplished, and compassionate depiction of a supposedly impenetrable community during the late 1960s and 70s. Written "For. Series: Wesleyan poetry.

Wesleyan University Press, 2000. PREMONITIONS: The Kaya Anthology of New Asian North American Poetry (E., Kaya Production, 1995

Wesleyan University Press, 2000., Kaya Production, 1995. MUAE: A Journal of Transcultural Production (E. Trans. Kaya Production, 1995-1996. The Fight for Democracy" (Associate producer), part 8 (Dir. Carl Byker), of the Emmy-award-winning 10-part documentary series The Pacific Century, Prod. Peter Bull and Alex Gibney, 1992. Also awarded a Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Award.

Chung's poems, with their snapshot-like qualities, are said to question conventional ideas of the onlooker's gaze, such as those . Crazy Melon and Chinese Apple: The Poems of Frances Chung (Wesleyan Poetry Series). Wesleyan University Press.

Chung's poems, with their snapshot-like qualities, are said to question conventional ideas of the onlooker's gaze, such as those of a tourist ethnic neighborhoods like New York's gentrifying Chinatown. Publishers Weekly also cites similarities to Carlos in Chung's poems' "generosity, unorthodox line-breaks and beauty. Kaya Production, 1995. Asian American Literary Award, poetry category, The Asian American Writers' Workshop, 2003. PEN Center USA Literary Award, finalist, poetry, PEN Center USA, 2002.

Frances Chung's poetry stands alone as the most perceptive, aesthetically accomplished, and compassionate depiction of a supposedly impenetrable community during the late 1960s and 70s. Written "For the Chinatown People" and imprinted with Chung's own ink seal, Crazy Melon is collects brief poems and prose vignettes set in New York's Chinatown and Lower East Side. Chung incorporates Spanish and Chinese into her English in deft evocations of these neighborhoods' streets, fantasies, commerce, and toil. The title of her second collection, Chinese Apple, translates the Chinese word for pomegranate: there she offers "small crimson bites" of new themes and cityscapes -- delightfully understated eroticism, tributes to other poets, impressions of other Chinese diasporic communities during her travels in Central America and Asia. Its new formal experiments show that Chung's poetic prowess continued to deepen before her early death.Publication of these two works will finally allow Chung's growing circle of admirers to experience the full range of her skills and sensibility, and will draw many others into that circle. Her poems are an inimitable synthesis of American urban vernacular and imagery, various East Asian and Spanish-language poetics, and a concern for ethnic and feminist cultural and political survival-in-writing that was so vital to American poets around the time that Chung first began to compose. Her always fresh perspective on the worlds around her smoothly shifts through multiple lenses, making wonderful use of her "power to dream in four languages."