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by John M. Kirk

Author: John M. Kirk
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: University Press of Florida; 1st edition (December 28, 1983)
Pages: 212 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.6
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Venerated as the creator of Cuba s first republic, declared by Fidel Castro to be the intellectual author of the second revolution, revered by Cuban exiles as the premier visionary of the democratic Cuban state, Jose Marti (1853-95) was a prolific and eclectic writer and a practical philosopher.

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Home Browse Books Book details, José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation. José Martí, Mentor of the Cuban Nation. Within the last three decades José Martí may be said to have penetrated the consciousness of the Cuban people as a whole; and, as one critic has correctly noted, in effect Martí represents the keystone of what can be termed the Cuban national identity.

Published December 28th 1983 by University Press of Florida (first published 1983). Jose Marti: Mentor of the Cuban Nation (A University of South Florida Book). 0813008123 (ISBN13: 9780813008127).

Internet Archive Wishlist, Political and social views. José Martí (1853-1895).

Kirk, John M. Tampa: University Presses of Florida, 5 c1983. As a youth, an important event occurred in the Cuban country side that allowed José Martí to blossom into a Cuban revolutionary. José Martí, the United States, and Race. University Press of Florida: 6 José Martí, the United States, and Race. Martí's father brought José Martí to the Cuban countryside to help him with work. Because Martí had extraordinary 11 handwriting and spelling, Martí’s father utilized his sons abilities to aid him in writing work reports. When working in the countryside alongside his father, two important things occurred.

When the an War of Independence ended in 1898 . Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES). John M. Kirk, Jose Marti: Mentor of the Cuban Nation (Tampa: University of Florida, 1982).

When the an War of Independence ended in 1898, Cuba was formally incorporated in the sphere of United States power and hegemony  . When the an War of Independence ended in 1898, Cuba was formally incorporated in the sphere of United States power and hegemony.

John M. Kirk, one of the world's leading Cuba specialists, is professor of Latin American . Kirk, one of the world's leading Cuba specialists, is professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. He is the author of Between God and the Party: Religion and Politics in Revolutionary Cuba and Jose Marti, Mentor of the Cuban Nation and the coauthor of Canada-Cuba Relations: The Other Good Neighbor Policy (all published by UPF). Leonardo Padura Fuentes, one of the most important writers working in Cuba today, is the prize-winning author of four novels, including Mascaras and Paisaje de otono.

Kirk, John M. Tampa: University Presses of Florida, c1983. Lexington Books, 2006. Jose Marti and the United States, and the Marxist interpretation of Cuban History. New Jersey: Transaction Inc. 1984

Kirk, John M. Martí, José, Manuel . ellechea Versos Sencillos. U of Houston: Arte Público Press, 1997. 1984.

University of South Florida. José Martí: Mentor of the Cuban Nation by John M. Kirk. University of Oregon.

Venerated as the creator of Cuba’s first republic, declared by Fidel Castro to be the “intellectual author” of the second revolution, revered by Cuban exiles as the premier visionary of the democratic Cuban state, Jose Marti (1853-95) was a prolific and eclectic writer and a practical philosopher.  In Jose Marti: Mentor of the Cuban Nation, John M. Kirk leads us to a better understanding of “the purest man” of the Latin race and one of the most underrated political thinkers of modern times.

As a scholarly statement, Kirk’s work contributes to a necessary reappraisal of Marti; it is a quest after the true esencia martiana—the essence of Marti’s sociopolitical thought.  Kirk deliberately departs from a strictly theoretical viewpoint in his well-documented synthesis of Marti’s theories.  The result is partially an explanation for the Cuban leader’s continued exaltation as the “apostle” of modern political movements of both the right and the left.

Kirk reviews the formative experiences of Marti’s youth through his letters and early literary endeavors to his deportation to Spain before the age of eighteen.  Marti’s observations from his travels on the realities of North American democracy and the struggles of Latin American nations to emerge from colonialism are used by Kirk to trace Marti’s sociopolitical development, culminating in his aspirations for Cuba following its independence from Spain.

Kirk clarifies Marti’s visionary but quite specific designs for the moral foundation, social, political, and economic structures and policies of the liberated republic—concepts that Marti would have attempted to implement had he not been killed by Spanish forces.

Marti’s own words, here translated by Kirk, show a wise and compassionate leader dedicated to the welfare of all peoples.