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by Charles O. Hartman

Author: Charles O. Hartman
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (January 21, 1981)
Pages: 216 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.8
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Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody. by Charles O. Hartman.

Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody. To make sense of free verse" in theory or in practice, the whole study of prosody-the function of rhythm in poetry-must be revised and rethought. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Princeton University PressReleased: Jul 14, 2014ISBN: 9781400855384Format: book.

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Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody by Charles O. Title Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody.

To make sense of free verse" in theory or in practice, the whole study of prosody-the function .

To make sense of free verse" in theory or in practice, the whole study of prosody-the function of rhythm in poetry-must be revised and rethought. Stating this as the issue that poets and critics have faced in the past century, Charles Hartman takes up the challenge and develops a theory of prosody that includes the most characteristic forms of twentieth-century poetry. Originally published in 1981.

When Professor Hartman describes prosody 'in its natural habitat' the results are extremely illuminating.

HELMUT BONHEIM UNIVERSITY OF COLOGNE Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody. Princeton, Ne Princeton University Press. When Professor Hartman describes prosody 'in its natural habitat' the results are extremely illuminating.

Series: Princeton Legacy Library. Book Description: To make sense of free verse" in theory or in practice, the whole study of prosody-the function of rhythm in poetry-must be revised and rethought.

2 Charles O. Hartman’s Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980) . 4 See, for example, the adjectives employed by d. h. Lawrence i. Lawrence in ‘Poetry of the Present’, in Michael .

Charles O. Hartman, Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody (Princeton, NJ, 1980), p. 1. oogle Scholar

Charles O. oogle Scholar. 9. Robert Hass, Listening and Making, in Twentieth Century Pleasures (New York, 1984), p. 11. 10. Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, in William K. Winsatt, J. ed. Selected Poetry and Prose (New York, 1961), p. 73, lines 362–373.

Hartman wants to establish a prosody of free verse that is equal to traditional verse

Hartman wants to establish a prosody of free verse that is equal to traditional verse. He can’t do so without altogether disregarding the compounding effect of meter and end-rhyme. Most of us use rhythm in a literal and a figurative sense – but mixing these two uses in a book which professes to establish a prosody (and which takes great care to carefully define words like free and prosody) is a considerable oversight that undercuts the entire argument.

To make sense of "free verse" in theory or in practice, the study of prosody - the function of rhythm in poetry - must be.

To make sense of "free verse" in theory or in practice, the study of prosody - the function of rhythm in poetry - must be revised and rethought. In Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody, Charles Hartman develops a theory of prosody that includes the most characteristic forms of twentieth-century poetry. Hartman examines nonmetrical verse, discusses the conventions that have emerged in the absence of meter, and shows how these conventions can work prosodically

To make sense of free verse" in theory or in practice, the whole study of prosody--the function of rhythm in poetry--must be revised and rethought. Stating this as the issue that poets and critics have faced in the past century, Charles Hartman takes up the challenge and develops a theory of prosody that includes the most characteristic forms of twentieth-century poetry.

Originally published in 1981.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.