» » Mutha Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Black Performance and Cultural Criticism)
Download Mutha Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Black Performance and Cultural Criticism) djvu

Download Mutha Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Black Performance and Cultural Criticism) djvu

by L. H. Stallings

Author: L. H. Stallings
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Ohio State University Press; 1 edition (July 8, 2007)
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf lrf mbr mobi

Mutha Is Half a Word: In. .has been added to your Cart. Funk the Erotic: Transaesthetics and Black Sexual Cultures (New Black Studies Series).

Mutha Is Half a Word: In. A Taste for Brown Sugar: Black Women in Pornography. Mireille Miller-Young. Aberrations In Black: Toward A Queer Of Color Critique (Critical American Studies). Roderick A. Ferguson.

3 Mutha’ Is Half a Word! : Tar Baby Trope and Blue Material in Black Female Comedy.

While delineating on the position and subjectivity of Black women in the United States, Toni Morrison explains how historical discourses have failed to grasp Black women’s subjectivities: True the black woman did the housework, the drudgery; true, she reared the children, often alone, but she did all of that while occupying a place on the job market, a place her mate could not get or which his pride would not let him accept. 3 Mutha’ Is Half a Word! : Tar Baby Trope and Blue Material in Black Female Comedy.

Mutha Is Half a Word book. L. H. Stallings offers distinct close readings of understudied African American women’s Mutha’ is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture explores the importance of sexual desire in the formation of radical Black females’ subjectivities in Black women’s culture through the trope of the indefinable trickster figure.

The title of the book Mutha Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Black Performance and Cultural Criticism) is a reference to this album as it stands as a stereotype of modern black female humor. Husbands & Whores".

The black woman and the trickster-trope of unnaming - The erotics of a healing subjectivity: sexual desire, the spirit, and the divine nature of trickster - "Mutha is half a word!": tar baby trope and blue material in black female comedy - Badd-nasty: tricking the tropes of the Bad Nigga.

Black Performance and Cultural Criticism, vol. 1, Ohio State University Press

Black Performance and Cultural Criticism, vol. 1, Ohio State University Press. Mutha’ Is Half a Word : Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture. Ohio State University Press, 2007. The study is distinctly different because it explores folklore, vernacular, and trickster strategies of queerness alongside theories of queer studies to create new readings of desire in literary texts, hip-hop and neo-soul music, and comedic performances by Black females. VL - 1. T3 - Black Performance and Cultural Criticism.

Mutha is Half a Word strives to break that convention. This book provides a much-needed analysis of trickster tradition in regard to gender, sexuality, and Black female sexual desire. It is the only study to focus specifically on trickster figures and African American female culture

Mutha is Half a Word strives to break that convention. It is the only study to focus specifically on trickster figures and African American female culture. In addition, it contributes to conversations regarding the cultural representation of Black female desire in ways that are t strategically invested in heterormative binaries of male/female and ual

Mutha Is Half a Word by L. Stallings, July 8, 2007, Ohio State University Press . Mutha Is Half a Word.

Mutha Is Half a Word. Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Black Performance and Cultural Criticism).

Mutha Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Black Performance and Cultural Criticism) by .

ie. ответ 1 ретвит 2 отметки Нравится. Mutha Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (Black Performance and Cultural Criticism) by . mance/dp/081421056. ответ 2 ретвитов 1 отметка Нравится.

Mutha’ Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture, Black Performance and Cultural Criticism. Columbus: Ohio State University Press. Thompson, Lisa B. 2009

Mutha’ Is Half a Word: Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture, Black Performance and Cultural Criticism. 2009. Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class, The New Black Studies Series. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Mutha' is Half a Word explores the importance of sexual desire in the formation of radical Black females' subjectivities in Black women's culture through the trope of the indefinable trickster figure. L.H. Stallings offers distinct close readings of understudied African American women's texts through a critical engagement with folklore and queer theory. To date, most studies on the trickster figure have rarely reflected the boldness and daring of the figure itself. Emblematic of change and transgression, the trickster has inappropriately become the methodological tool for conservative cultural studies analysis, Mutha' is Half a Word strives to break that convention.This book provides an analysis of trickster tradition in regard to gender, sexuality, and Black female sexual desire. It contributes to conversations regarding the cultural representation of Black female desire in ways that are not strategically invested in heteronormative binaries of male/female and heterosexual/homosexual. The study is distinctly different because it explores folklore, vernacular, and trickster strategies of queerness alongside theories of queer studies to create new readings of desire in literary texts, hip-hop and neo-soul music, and comedic performances by Black females.