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by William Fitzgerald

Author: William Fitzgerald
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (March 13, 2000)
Pages: 12 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lit doc mobi rtf

This book deals with the ways in which the ancient Roman literary imagination explored the phenomenon .

This book deals with the ways in which the ancient Roman literary imagination explored the phenomenon of slavery. It asks what the free imagination made of the experience of living with slaves, beings who both were and were not fellow humans. The book covers the full range of Roman literature, and is arranged thematically. It discusses the ideological relation of Roman literature to the institution of slavery, and also the ways in which slavery provided a metaphor for other relationships and experiences, and in particular for literature itself.

Series: Roman Literature and its Contexts. This book explores the presence of slaves and slavery in Roman literature and asks particularly what the free imagination made of the experience of living with slaves, beings who both were and were not fellow humans

Series: Roman Literature and its Contexts. Recommend to librarian. This book explores the presence of slaves and slavery in Roman literature and asks particularly what the free imagination made of the experience of living with slaves, beings who both were and were not fellow humans. As a shadow humanity, slaves furnished the free with other selves and imaginative alibis as well as mediators between and substitutes for their peers. As presences that witnessed their owners' most unguarded moments they possessed a knowledge that was the object of both curiosity and anxiety.

p. cm. (Roman literature and its contexts) Includes bibliographical references and index. hardback) (paperback). Latin literature History and criticism. Slavery in literature. Slavery Rome History.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2000, William Fitzgerald and others published Slavery and the Roman Literary Imagination .

Whether or not we believe Augustus and Phaedrus in 21 See W. Fitzgerald (2000) 26 on the slave as a philosopher " who knows how the world works through being at the bottom of the ladder. Bloomer (1997) 91-93 on Phaedrus' rhetoric as a freedman. The Intersection of Poetic and Imperial Authority in Phaedrus’ Fables.

The book is exceptionally well written, and a welcome addition to the excellent "Roman Literature and Its Contexts" series. Choice explores with insight and flair the symbiotic relationship between Roman slaves and their masters. In short, an attractive and provocative work.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Slavery and the Roman Literary Imagination (Roman Literature and its Contexts). Категория: Литература, Литературоведение. William Fitzgerald Jenkins (Murray Leinster).

Roman Literature and Its Contexts.

Only 5 left! Book Format: Paperback. Roman Literature and Its Contexts. Cambridge University Press.

The memory of the Roman Republic exercised a powerful influence on several generations of Romans who lived under its political and cultural successor, the Principate or Empire. Empire and Memory explores how (and why) that memory manifested itself over the course of the early Principate. Making use of the close relationship between memoria and historia in Roman thought and drawing on modern studies of historical memory, this book offers case-studies of major imperial authors from the reign of Tiberius to that of Trajan ( AD 14–117).

This book deals with the ways in which the ancient Roman literary imagination explored the phenomenon of slavery. It asks what the free imagination made of the experience of living with slaves, beings who both were and were not fellow humans. The book covers the full range of Roman literature, and is arranged thematically. It discusses the ideological relation of Roman literature to the institution of slavery, and also the ways in which slavery provided a metaphor for other relationships and experiences, and in particular for literature itself.