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by Patrick Brantlinger

Author: Patrick Brantlinger
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (September 16, 2011)
Pages: 288 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt mobi doc lit

Readers familiar with Patrick Brantlinger's many distinguished books on Victorian literature will welcome his most recent contribution, Taming Cannibals: Race and the Victorians, which he describes as the third in a 'trilogy' of Victorian and postcolonial studies projects that.

Readers familiar with Patrick Brantlinger's many distinguished books on Victorian literature will welcome his most recent contribution, Taming Cannibals: Race and the Victorians, which he describes as the third in a 'trilogy' of Victorian and postcolonial studies projects that include his groundbreaking Rule of Darkness and Dark Vanishings

In Taming Cannibals, Patrick Brantlinger unravels contradictions embedded in the racist and imperialist ideology of the British Empire.

In Taming Cannibals, Patrick Brantlinger unravels contradictions embedded in the racist and imperialist ideology of the British Empire. For many Victorians, the idea of taming cannibals or civilizing savages was oxymoronic: civilization was a goal that the nonwhite peoples of the world could not attain or, at best, could only approximate, yet the "civilizing mission" was viewed as the ultimate justification for imperialism

X, 277 p. Includes bibliographical references and index.

X, 277 p. Missionaries and cannibals in nineteenth-century Fiji - King Billy's bones : the last Tasmanians - Going native in nineteenth-century history and literature - "God works by races" : Benjamin Disraeli's Caucasian Arabian Hebrew tent - Race and class in the 1860s - The unbearable lightness of being Irish - Mummy love : H. Rider Haggard. And racial archaeology - Shadows of the coming race - Epilogue : Kipling's The white man's burden and its afterlives.

In Taming Cannibals, Patrick Brantlinger unravels contradictions embedded. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Taming Cannibals: Race and the Victorians as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Taming Cannibals : Race and the Victorians. In Taming Cannibals, Patrick Brantlinger unravels contradictions embedded in the racist and imperialist ideology of the British Empire. by Patrick Brantlinger. For many Victorians, the idea of taming cannibals or civilizing savages was oxymoronic: civilization was a goal that the nonwhite peoples of the world could not attain or, at best, could only approximate, yet the "civilizing mission" was viewed as the ultimate justification for imperialism.

About Patrick Brantlinger. Served as Chair of English, 1994. Served as Vice-President and President, Midwest Victorian Studies Association, 1991-93. Taming Cannibals: Race and the Victorians. Victorian Literature and Postcolonial Studies. Served as NEH Evaluator, Actors' Theater "Victorian Season," Louisville, KY 1988-89. Selected Honors and Awards. College Alumni Association Distinguished Professor, 2001. Dark Vanishings: Discourse on the Extinction of Primitive Races, 1800-1930.

Taming Cannibals: Race and the Victorians. So this list is selective.

Brantlinger, Patrick. Taming Cannibals: Race and the Victorians, Cornell University Press, 2011. The Victorian Web, University Scholars Program, National University of Singapore, November 2000. p. 215. ^ Taylor, Howard S. ""The Poor Man's Burden" (Excerpt)". HERB: Resources for Teachers. Crosby, Ernest (1902). The Real White Man's Burden. For many Victorians, the idea of taming cannibals or civilizing savages was oxymoronic: civilization was a goal that the nonwhite peoples of the world could not attain or, at best, could only approximate, yet the "civilizing mission" was viewed as the ultimate justification for imperialism

In Taming Cannibals, Patrick Brantlinger unravels contradictions embedded in the racist and imperialist ideology of the British Empire. For many Victorians, the idea of taming cannibals or civilizing savages was oxymoronic: civilization was a goal that the nonwhite peoples of the world could not attain or, at best, could only approximate, yet the "civilizing mission" was viewed as the ultimate justification for imperialism. Similarly, the supposedly unshakeable certainty of Anglo-Saxon racial superiority was routinely undercut by widespread fears about racial degeneration through contact with "lesser" races or concerns that Anglo-Saxons might be superseded by something superior―an even "fitter" or "higher" race or species.

Brantlinger traces the development of those fears through close readings of a wide range of texts―including Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, Fiji and the Fijians by Thomas Williams, Daily Life and Origin of the Tasmanians by James Bonwick, The Descent of Man by Charles Darwin, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Culture and Anarchy by Matthew Arnold, She by H. Rider Haggard, and The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. Throughout the wide-ranging, capacious, and rich Taming Cannibals, Brantlinger combines the study of literature with sociopolitical history and postcolonial theory in novel ways.