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by Arthur Riss

Author: Arthur Riss
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (September 18, 2006)
Pages: 248 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: rtf lrf mobi doc

Series: Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture (150).

Series: Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture (150). Recommend to librarian. Situating Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Frederick Douglass at the center of antebellum debates over the person-hood of the slave, this 2006 book examines how a nation dedicated to the proposition that 'all men are created equal' formulates arguments both for and against race-based slavery.

Автор: Arthur Riss Название: Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century . In Nineteenth-Century American Literature and the Long Civil War, Cody Marrs argues that the war is a far more elastic boundary for literary history than has frequently been assumed.

In Nineteenth-Century American Literature and the Long Civil War, Cody Marrs argues that the war is a far more elastic boundary for literary history than has frequently been assumed.

Электронная книга "Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature", Arthur Riss. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Moving boldly between literary analysis and political theory, contemporary and antebellum .

Start by marking Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Moving boldly between literary analysis and political theory, contemporary and antebellum . Antebellum debates about liberalism centred around slavery and what it did to the status of the slave as person.

American literature is literature written or produced in the United States of America and its preceding colonies (for specific discussions of poetry and theater, see Poetry of the United States and Theater in the United States)

American literature is literature written or produced in the United States of America and its preceding colonies (for specific discussions of poetry and theater, see Poetry of the United States and Theater in the United States). Before the founding of the United States, the British colonies on the eastern coast of the present-day United States were heavily influenced by English literature. The American literary tradition thus began as part of the broader tradition of English literature.

This 2006 book raises controversial questions about the intersections between race, literature and American .

This 2006 book raises controversial questions about the intersections between race, literature and American intellectual history.

That Douglass' identity as a man was not evident to countless scientists, ministers, legal scholars, and other defenders of slavery is the subject of Arthur Riss' book Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature

That Douglass' identity as a man was not evident to countless scientists, ministers, legal scholars, and other defenders of slavery is the subject of Arthur Riss' book Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. According to Riss, the triumph of liberalism has led to a failure in criticism, a failure to historicize antebellum texts properly by foregrounding the debate over "personhood.

Article in Nineteenth-Century Literature 62(4):538-541 · March 2008 with 5 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Are you sure you want to remove Race, slavery, and liberalism in nineteenth-century . Eva's hair and the sentiments of race. Cambridge studies in American literature and culture, Cambridge studies in American literature and culture ;, 150.

Are you sure you want to remove Race, slavery, and liberalism in nineteenth-century American literature from your list? Race, slavery, and liberalism in nineteenth-century American literature. A is for anything : US liberalism and the making of The scarlet letter. The art of discrimination : The marble faun, "Chiefly about war matters," and the aesthetics of anti-Black racism. Freedom, ethics, and the necessity of persons : Frederick Douglass and the scene of resistance.

approach to American literature, and by recent efforts to globalize in nineteenth-century American writing, while exploring the inevitable . Books related to Race, Transnationalism, and Nineteenth-Century American Literary Studies.

Inspired by Toni Morrison's call for an interracial approach to American literature, and by recent efforts to globalize He pays close attention to racial representations and ideology in nineteenth-century American writing, while exploring the inevitable tension between the local and the global in this writing. Levine addresses transatlanticism, the Black Atlantic, citizenship, empire, temperance, climate change, black nationalism, book history, temporality, Kantian transnational aesthetics, and a number of other issues.

Moving boldly between literary analysis and political theory, contemporary and antebellum US culture, Arthur Riss invites readers to rethink prevailing accounts of the relationship between slavery, liberalism, and literary representation. Situating Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Frederick Douglass at the center of antebellum debates over the person-hood of the slave, this 2006 book examines how a nation dedicated to the proposition that 'all men are created equal' formulates arguments both for and against race-based slavery. This revisionary argument promises to be unsettling for literary critics, political philosophers, historians of US slavery, as well as those interested in the link between literature and human rights.