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Download Boys Will be Girls: The Feminine Ethic and British Children's Fiction, 1857-1917 djvu

Download Boys Will be Girls: The Feminine Ethic and British Children's Fiction, 1857-1917 djvu

by Claudia Nelson

Author: Claudia Nelson
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press (May 1, 1991)
Pages: 216 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi azw mobi lrf

Boys Will be Girls book.

Boys Will be Girls book. Claudia Nelson, in looking at children's fiction of l857-l917, finds that the figure of the angel appeared as an ideal n Feminist criticism of nineteenth-century literature has traditionally repudiated the "angel in the house"ÐÐa domestic figure who was kept in her place, isolated from the world of power and patriarchy and any influence over it except through.

Children's stories, English English fiction Ethics in literature Femininity in literature Masculinity in literature Sex role in. .Similar books and articles. Added to PP index 2015-02-13. Total views 1 ( of 2,258,150 ).

Children's stories, English English fiction Ethics in literature Femininity in literature Masculinity in literature Sex role in literature. Philosophy of Literature in Aesthetics. categorize this paper). Recent downloads (6 months) 1 ( of 2,258,150 ). How can I increase my downloads? Downloads. Sorry, there are not enough data points to plot this chart.

Claudia Nelson, in looking at children's fiction of l857-l917, finds that the figure of the angel appeared as an ideal not just in literature intended for young women, but also in books for boys.

Published: 1 June 1992. in Nineteenth-Century Literature. Nineteenth-Century Literature, Volume 47, pp 126-129; doi:10.

Boys Will Be Girls The Feminine Ethic and British Children's Fiction, 1857-1917. Writing the reader: The literary child in and beyond the book. Children's Literature Association Quarterly 31 (3), 222-236, 2006. Family Ties in Victorian England. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007. Little strangers: Portrayals of adoption and foster care in America, 1850-1929. Sexual pedagogies: sex education in Britain, Australia, and America, 1879–2000.

Winner, Children’s Literature Association book award, 2004; honorable .

Winner, Children’s Literature Association book award, 2004; honorable mention, 1992 and 2013. Claudia Nelson, in looking at children’s fiction of l857-l917, finds that the figure of the angel appeared as an ideal not just in literature intended for young women, but also in books for boys. The eleven contributors to The Girl s Own explore British and American Victorian representations of the adolescent girl by drawing on such contemporary sources as conduct books, housekeeping manuals, periodicals, biographies, photographs, paintings, and educational treatises.

Also by Claudia Nelson. BOYS WILL BE GIRLS: The Feminine Ethic and British Children's Fiction, 1857-1917. 6 'Under the Guidance of a Wise Mother': British Sex Education at the Fin de Siecle Claudia Nelson. INVISffiLE MEN: Fatherhood in Victorian Periodicals, 1850-1910. 7 'The Mothers of Our Soldiers' Children': Motherhood, Immorality, and the War Baby Scandal, 1914-18 Susan R. Grayzel. 8 Sexuality, Maternity, and Femininity in Films Exhibited in Britain, 1914-19 Anne Morey.

Boys Will be Girls: The Feminine Ethic and British Children's Fiction, 1857-1917 May 1, 1991. Representing Children in Chinese and . Children's Literature (Studies in Childhood, 1700 to the Present) Apr 8, 2016. by Claudia Nelson, Rebecca Morris. Precocious Children and Childish Adults: Age Inversion in Victorian Literature May 18, 2012.

Find nearly any book by Claudia Nelson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Family Ties in Victorian England (Victorian Life and Times). ISBN 9780275986971 (978-0-275-98697-1) Hardcover, Praeger, 2007. Find signed collectible books: 'Family Ties in Victorian England (Victorian Life and Times)'.

Boys Will Be Girls: The Feminine Ethic and British Children's Fiction, 1857–1917. Girls learn about "femininity" from childhood onwards, first through their relationships in the family, and later from their teachers and peers

Boys Will Be Girls: The Feminine Ethic and British Children's Fiction, 1857–1917. The Impact of Victorian Children's Fiction. The reform of girls' secondary and higher education in victorian England: A study of elites and educational change. Girls learn about "femininity" from childhood onwards, first through their relationships in the family, and later from their teachers and peers. Using sources which vary from diaries to Inspector’s reports, this book studies the socialization of middle- and working-class girls in late Victorian and early-Edwardian England.

Feminist criticism of nineteenth-century literature has traditionally repudiated the "angel in the house"ÐÐa domestic figure who was kept in her place, isolated from the world of power and patriarchy and any influence over it except through her children. Claudia Nelson, in looking at children's fiction of l857-l917, finds that the figure of the angel appeared as an ideal not just in literature intended for young women, but also in books for boys. Her book is an exploration of the changing ideals of masculinity disseminated in popular writing for children over a sixty-year period and of the implications of her discoveries for feminist scholarship, much of which she challenges.

Nelson argues that during the early Victorian period in children's literature, as in popular adult fiction, the idealized figure of the androgynous angelic boy recurs,  enshrined as the avatar of a "manliness" that has little to do with what we today would recognize as stereotypical masculinity. Such works were saturated not only by religion but also by the religion of femininity.  

In this book, we are introduced to many boys' novels that are rarely read today, and we are taught to look with new eyes at old favorites like Kipling, Stevenson, Grahame, Barrie, and Nesbit. Nelson covers such genres as the school novel, the historical tale, the adventure, and the fantasy, along the way demonstrating a tremendous breadth of reading of feminist and social history theory, as well as of children's literature. Her writing is jargon-free and her insights into the cultural importance of Victorian children's fiction highly illuminating. Among the first serious studies of this subject, it will be of interest  to literary and feminist scholars of the Victorian and early modern periods.