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Download The Merchant of Venice: A Comedy in Five Acts djvu

by William Shakespeare

Author: William Shakespeare
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: BiblioLife (November 2, 2008)
Pages: 76 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw txt doc docx

ACT I. SCENE I. Venice. Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice.

ACT I. Enter ANTONIO, SALERIO, and SOLANIO.

The Merchant of Venice. The Merchant of Venice’ (1599) by the English poet, playwright and actor, William Shakespeare, is a tragic comedy which centres on the themes of money, romance and Anti-semitism. The Merchant of Venice Tracklist. In the play we have Bassanio going along with his dearest friend, Antonio to the Jewish usurer, Shylock, to ask for some money with which he, Bassanio, is going to use to travel to Belmont to present himself as a suitor to the lady Portia. They make a deal in which Antonio would have to give Shylock a pound of his flesh of he is unable to repay the lent money in the allotted time.

Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice Act 5 scene 1, from your trusted Shakespeare source. Please see the bottom of this page for helpful resources. ACT V SCENE I. Belmont. Avenue to PORTIA'S house. The moon shines bright: in such a night as this, When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees. And they did make no noise, in such a night. Troilus methinks mounted the Troyan walls. And sigh'd his soul toward the Grecian tents, 5. Where Cressid lay that night. Did Thisbe fearfully o'ertrip the dew. And saw the lion's shadow ere himself.

Fourteen comedies were collected by Shakespeare's fellow actors in the First Folio of his complete plays, published after . To make such comparisons is to see that The Merchant of Venice is one of Shakespeare's darker comedies

Fourteen comedies were collected by Shakespeare's fellow actors in the First Folio of his complete plays, published after his death. The majority of them had titles evocative of an idea (All's Well That Ends Well, Love's Labour's Lost, Much Ado About Nothing) or a time of year (Twelfth Night, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Winter's Tale). To make such comparisons is to see that The Merchant of Venice is one of Shakespeare's darker comedies. The blurring of perspectives between the romantic and the sinister is especially apparent in the beautiful but ironic love-duet of Lorenzo and Jessica at the beginning of the final act.

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8 Shakespeare’s Comic Devices Shakespeare’s Comic Devices 1. Happy ending 2. Mistaken identity 3. Women are smarter than men 4. Villain is punished in the . Villain is punished in the end. 9. 10 5. Stock Characters (stereotypes) a. Clown (physical humor) (Lancelot Gobbo) b. Talks all the time (Gratiano). 12 Why would Shakespeare set his comedy in Venice? 13 Venice, the center of the renaissance, was called the jewel box of Europe. 14 The carnival in Venice lasted four months of every year. 15 The Rialto Bridge was considered the Wall Street of Venice.

William Shakespeare wrote The Merchant of Venice between 1596-1598. It is usually classified as a romantic comedy though its dramatic scenes are hugely popular and some speeches amongst characters like Shylock and Portia have incited much study and debate. The play begins with Bassanio, a young man and a Venetian of noble rank. Bassanio would like to earn the hand of the rich heiress Portia, but since he's squandered away his wealth he needs some help reaching the 3000 ducat fee that guarantees him as a suitor. Bassanio asks his friend Antonio, a merchant of Venice who is wealthy and has.

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