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Download Demosthenes: Against Meidias (Classic Commentaries) djvu

by D.M. Macdowell,Demosthenes

Author: D.M. Macdowell,Demosthenes
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Bristol Classical Press (September 26, 2002)
Pages: 456 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lit rtf txt lrf

Demosthenes (Against Meidias, 221)-The orator asked the Athenians to defend . D. M. MacDowell, Demosthenes the Orator, ch. 3 (passim); "Demosthenes".

Demosthenes (Against Meidias, 221)-The orator asked the Athenians to defend their legal system, by making an example of the defendant for the instruction of others. Demosthenes decided to prosecute his wealthy opponent and wrote the judicial oration Against Meidias. According to Professor of Classics Cecil Wooten, Cicero ended his career by trying to imitate Demosthenes' political role. Plutarch drew attention in his Life of Demosthenes to the strong similarities between the personalities and careers of Demosthenes and Marcus Tullius Cicero:.

I. Kalitsounakis, Demosthenes, 958; . Gibson, Interpreting a Classic, 1; . Kapparis, Apollodoros against Neaira, 62. The preference for S has been challenged by Dieter Irmer (Zur Genealogie, 95-99) and defended by Hermann Wankel (R. Sealey, Demosthenes and His Time, 222). Demosthenes the Orator. Oxford University Press. Against Aristocrates. Download as PDF. Printable version.

Download books for free. Demosthenes: Against Meidias. Against Aristogeiton 1 and 2 (21-26). Loeb Classical Library No. 299). Скачать (PDF) . Читать.

Demosthenes: Against Meidias. Категория: Математика, Математическая логика.

Pp. xvi + 440. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990 Abstract. Pp. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990. Aris & Phillips Classical Texts.

com's Demosthenes Author Page. Las Tejanas: 300 Years of History (Jack and Doris Smothers Series in Texas History, Life, and Culture, 10) Jan 1, 2010.

DEMOSTHENES (Douglas M. MacDowell). 27. Against Aphobus I. 28. Against Aphobus II. 29. Against Aphobus for Phanus. The speeches against Aphobus and Onetor (Orations 27-31) are obviously written for Demosthenes himself to deliver in court, and the same may, less certainly, be true of the speech for Phormion (Oration 36). The other speeches in this volume are written for delivery by various other men. Questions of authenticity therefore arise.

Demosthenes' prosecution of Meidias for punching him in the face is a. .

Demosthenes' prosecution of Meidias for punching him in the face is a masterpiece of Greek oratorical prose. Demosthenes was punched in the face by Meidias in the theatre at Athens in 348 BC. His prosecution - a masterpiece of Greek oratorical prose - is one of the most intriguing forensic speeches to survive.

Categories: Fiction Literature, Fiction Classic, Nonfiction. He was educated at Shrewsbury School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated as senior classic (1831). He then became a barrister

Categories: Fiction Literature, Fiction Classic, Nonfiction. He then became a barrister. From 1849-1856 he was professor of law at Queen's College, Birmingham. In his academic role, he advised the judge Lord Denman in the important parliamentary privilege case of Stockdale v. Hansard. As counsel to Mrs Swinfen, the plaintiff in the celebrated will case Swinfen v. Swinfen (1856), he brought an action for remuneration for professional services, but.

Against Meidias book. Demosthenes was punched in the face by Meidias in the theater at Athens in 348 . His prosecution speech for this offence is one of the most intriguing texts in Greek literature. It tells the story of his long feud with Meidias and gives much valuable information about Athenian law and festivals, and about the concept of insolent behavior which the Greeks call hubris.

Demosthenes was punched in the face by Meidias in the theatre at Athens in 348 BC. His prosecution - a masterpiece of Greek oratorical prose - is one of the most intriguing forensic speeches to survive. It not only details Demosthenes' personal feud with Meidias but, in passing, gives valuable information about Athenian law and festivals, and especially about the Greek concept of hubris (insolent behaviour). This edition, originally published in 1990, represents the latest scholarship on the text, collating a larger number of MSS than hitherto. It includes a very full introduction on historical, legal, literary and textual matters; a complete facing-page translation; and a detailed commentary.