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Download Realism’s Empire: Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel djvu

Download Realism’s Empire: Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel djvu

by Geoffrey Baker

Author: Geoffrey Baker
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Ohio State University Press; 2 edition (August 22, 2009)
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi lit azw rtf

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Empiricism and empire : La peau de chagrin - Marginal realism in Le père Goriot - Realism, romance, and La fille aux yeux d'or - Economies of romance and history in Phineas Finn - Mapping and unmapping Phineas Finn and Phineas redux - Global London and the way we live no. .

Empiricism and empire : La peau de chagrin - Marginal realism in Le père Goriot - Realism, romance, and La fille aux yeux d'or - Economies of romance and history in Phineas Finn - Mapping and unmapping Phineas Finn and Phineas redux - Global London and the way we live now - "Berlin wird Weltstadt" : nation, city, and world in Cécile - The imaginative geography of Effi Briest - Conclusion : the limits of "realism". Embargo: Item embargoed for five years. ISBN: 9780814210987 (print) 0814210988 (print).

Geoffrey Baker argues that there is an intrinsic tension between what he terms "empiricism" and "enchantment" in the novel that reflects a paradox central to the dynamics of imperialism. On the one hand, the exploration and mapping of previously unknown territories disenchanted the world, reducing sites that had inspired feelings of mystery and awe into territories to be exploited for the benefit of the imperial power

Realism's Empire : Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel. If realist novels are the literary avatars of secular science and rational progress, then why are so many canonical realist works organized around a fear of that progress?

Realism's Empire : Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel. If realist novels are the literary avatars of secular science and rational progress, then why are so many canonical realist works organized around a fear of that progress? Realism is openly indebted, at the level of form and content, to imperialist and scientific advances.

In Realism’s Empire: Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel, Geoffrey Baker demonstrates that realist fiction’s stance toward both progress and the foreign or supernatural is much more complex than established scholarship has assumed. The work of Honoré de Balzac, Anthony Trollope, and Theodor Fontane explicitly laments the loss of mystery in the world due to increased knowledge and exploration.

Realisms Empire Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel. The Ohio State University Press. This book is dedicated to my family, for their never-ending support; to my fearless and patient teachers in the California public schools, from Gladys Blalock in sixth grade to Doris Lang in twelfth; and to the memory of Douglas Lee Kratz. indb 9. 6/25/2009 3:49:13 PM.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Empiricism and empire : La peau de chagrin Marginal realism in Le Pe?re Goriot Realism, romance, and La fille aux yeux d'or Economies of romance and history in Phineas Finn Mapping and unmapping Phineas Finn and Phineas redux Global London and the way we live now "Berlin wird Weltstadt" : nation, city, and world in Ce?cile The imaginative geography of Effi Briest. Conclusion : the limits of "realism". Personal Name: Balzac, Honore? de, 1799-1850 Criticism and interpretation.

Realism's Empire: Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel (Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, c2009), by Geoffrey Baker (PDF at Ohio State). Home Economics: Domestic Fraud in Victorian England (Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, c2008), by Rebecca Stern (PDF at Ohio State).

In the nineteenth century .

In the nineteenth century, epic poetry in the Homeric style was widely seen as an ancient and anachronistic genre, yet Victorian authors worked to recreate it for the modern world. Simon Dentith explores the relationship between epic and the evolution of Britain's national identity in the nineteenth century up to the apparent demise of all notions of heroic warfare in the catastrophe of the First World War. Paradoxically, writers found equivalents of the societies which produced Homeric or Northern epics not in Europe, but on the margins of empire and among its subject peoples.

The Nineteenth-Century Novel and Empire. Throughout the nineteenth century, many other domestic novels follow the same pattern, according to which the quietest of lives in the seemingly most placid English towns or country estates turn out to have exotic connections to far-flung parts of the empire. A familiar example occurs in Dickens’s Great Expectations (1869), where Pip’s mysterious windfall turns out to come from the transported convict Magwitch, who while making his fortune in Australia dreams of making a gentleman back in England.

If realist novels are the literary avatars of secular science and rational progress, then why are so many canonical realist works organized around a fear of that progress? Realism is openly indebted, at the level of form and content, to imperialist and scientific advances. However, critical emphasis on this has obscured the extent to which major novelists of the period openly worried about the fate of mystery and the dissolution of tradition that accompanied science’s shrinking of the world. Realism’s modernization is inseparable from nostalgia. In Realism’s Empire: Empiricism and Enchantment in the Nineteenth-Century Novel, Geoffrey Baker demonstrates that realist fiction’s stance toward both progress and the foreign or supernatural is much more complex than established scholarship has assumed. The work of Honoré de Balzac, Anthony Trollope, and Theodor Fontane explicitly laments the loss of mystery in the world due to increased knowledge and exploration. To counter this loss and to generate the complications required for narrative, these three authors import peripheral, usually colonial figures into the metropolitan centers they otherwise depict as disenchanted and rationalized: Paris, London, and Berlin. Baker’s book examines the consequences of this duel for realist narrative and readers’ understandings of its historical moment. In so doing, Baker shows Balzac, Trollope, and Fontane grappling with new realities that frustrate their inherited means of representation and oversee a significant shift in the development of the novel.