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Download Colonies, Cults and Evolution: Literature, Science and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Writing (Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture) djvu

Download Colonies, Cults and Evolution: Literature, Science and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Writing (Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture) djvu

by David Amigoni

Author: David Amigoni
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (January 14, 2008)
Pages: 254 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw rtf lit mobi

Nineteenth-century British literature and culture are a rich field for .

Nineteenth-century British literature and culture are a rich field for interdisciplinary studies. Since the turn of the twentieth century, scholars and critics have tracked the intersections and tensions between Victorian literature and the visual arts, politics, social organisation, economic life, technical innovations, scientific thought - in short, culture in its broadest sense. This study considers how late nineteenth-century literature and arts tackled the scientific question, 'Are we automata?' An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction.

Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture) Paperback – February 17, 2011

Colonies, Cults and Evolution: Literature, Science and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Writing (Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture) Paperback – February 17, 2011. by. David Amigoni (Author).

Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture 59. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008.

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Colonies, Cults and Evolution book. Published January 1st 2008 by Cambridge University Press (first published December 6th 2007). Colonies, Cults and Evolution: Literature, Science and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Writing. Colonies, Cults and Evolution: Literature, Science and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Writing (Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture).

Colonies, Cults and Evolution makes a stimulating, controversial, and hence very welcome addition to the growing corpus of Victorian science and literature studies. David Amigoni, The British Society for Literature and Science.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. In Colonies, Cults and Evolution, David Amigoni takes us some steps closer to comprehending the incomprehensible by drawing out a dialogue between the older Romantics and the materialist tradition of natural science. The central theme of his book is how changes in evolutionary theory, anthropology and colonialism transformed the use and understanding of the concept of 'culture' over the course of the nineteenth century. The scope of Amigoni's book is vast, reaching from The Excursion and Aids to Reflection to The Golden Bough and Father and Son.

Series: Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Series: Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture. File: PDF, . 8 MB. Читать онлайн. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

The 19th century in science saw the birth of science as a profession; the term scientist was coined in 1833 by William Whewell, which soon replaced the older term of (natural) philosopher.

The concept of culture, now such an important term within both the arts and the sciences, is a legacy of the nineteenth century. By closely analyzing writings by evolutionary scientists such as Charles Darwin, Alfred Russell Wallace, and Herbert Spencer, alongside those of literary figures including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Arnold, Butler, and Gosse, David Amigoni shows how the modern concept of 'culture' developed out of the interdisciplinary interactions between literature, philosophy, anthropology, colonialism, and, in particular, Darwin's theories of evolution. He goes on to explore the relationship between literature and evolutionary science by arguing that culture was seen less as a singular idea or concept, and more as a field of debate and conflict. This fascinating book includes much material on the history of evolutionary thought and its cultural impact, and will be of interest to scholars of intellectual and scientific history as well as of literature.