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by Leila Abouzeid,Heather Logan Taylor,Elizabeth Fernea

Author: Leila Abouzeid,Heather Logan Taylor,Elizabeth Fernea
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Center for Middle Eastern Studies, The University of Texas at Austin (January 1, 1998)
Pages: 167 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf mobi azw txt

by Leila Abouzeid (Author, Translator), Heather Logan Taylor (Translator), Elizabeth Fernea (Foreword) & 0 more.

by Leila Abouzeid (Author, Translator), Heather Logan Taylor (Translator), Elizabeth Fernea (Foreword) & 0 more.

Return to Childhood book. Start by marking Return to Childhood: The Memoir of a Modern Moroccan Woman as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Return to Childhood: The Memoir of a Modern Moroccan Woman as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Austin, TX: Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, 1998. Recommend this journal.

Leila Abouzeid, whose novel Year of the Elephant has gone through six reprintings, has now translated her childhood memoir into English.

Layla Abu Zayd; Leila Abouzeid; Heather Logan Taylor. Modern Middle East Literature in Translation. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Leila Abouzeid, author of Year of the Elephant, has translated her childhood memoir into English. Against the background of Morocco's struggle for independence from French colonial rule, Abouzeid charts her deeply personal journey through family conflicts ignited by the country's civil unrest. Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the University of Texas at Austin.

when addressing different audiences. 6) El-Saadawi is a more prolific writer who was known to the West earlier, who appears more often on university syllabi, and whose corpus is more familiar and popular than Abouzeid's (sixteen works in print in translation versus four).

Leila Abouzeid, Heather Logan Taylor, Elizabeth Warnock Fernea. Leila Abouzeid, whose novel Year of the Elephant has gone through six reprintings, has now translated her childhood memoir into English. Published in Rabat in 1993 to critical acclaim, the work brings to life the interlocking dramas of family ties and political conflict. Against a background of Morocco's struggle for independence from French colonial rule, Abouzeid charts the development of personal relationships, between generations as well as between husbands and wives.

Cover: Return to Childhood. A noted Moroccan writer's memoir of her childhood during Morocco's struggle for independence. Middle Eastern Studies. The Memoir of a Modern Moroccan Woman. Translated from Arabic by the author, with Heather Logan Taylor; foreword by Elizabeth Fernea. Series: CMES Modern Middle East Literatures in Translation. This is a print-on-demand title.

The Memoir of a Modern Moroccan Woman, published in English in 1998, is one such book.

Leila Abouzeid's Return to Childhood: The Memoir of a Modern Moroccan Woman, published in English in 1998, is one such book. 1 As Abouzeid tells her readers in the preface to the English translation of her memoirs: "The work was meant for a non-Moroccan audience, and I felt it would give me the opportunity to correct some American stereotypes about Muslim. Abouzeid thus frames her memoirs as not so much a revelation of her inner self as much as a revision of an "Other's" presumed perception of her self. In so doing, she positions her work as a type of "writing back" in response to hegemonic discourses that misrepresent the reality of Muslim women's lives.

Leila Abouzeid, whose novel Year of the Elephant has gone through six reprintings, has now translated her childhood memoir into English. Published in Rabat in 1993 to critical acclaim, the work brings to life the interlocking dramas of family ties and political conflict.

Against a background of Morocco's struggle for independence from French colonial rule, Abouzeid charts the development of personal relationships, between generations as well as between husbands and wives. Abouzeid's father is a central figure; as a strong advocate of Moroccan nationalism, he was frequently imprisoned by the French and his family forced to flee the capital. Si Hmed was a public hero, but the young daughter's memories of her famous father and of the family's plight because of his political activities are not so idyllic.

The memoir utilizes multiple voices, especially those of women, in a manner reminiscent of the narrative strategies of the oral tradition in Moroccan culture. Return to Childhood may also be classified as an autobiography, a form only now gaining respect as a valid literary genre in the Middle East. Abouzeid's own introduction and Elizabeth Fernea's foreword discuss this new development in Arabic literature.