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by Daniel O'Hara

Author: Daniel O'Hara
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Columbia University Press; First Edition edition (October 15, 1992)
Pages: 311 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: azw rtf mbr txt

For O'Hara, radical parody thus "defines the postmodern experience of the sublime play of discourses in the formation of critical identity"

For O'Hara, radical parody thus "defines the postmodern experience of the sublime play of discourses in the formation of critical identity". Throughout, O'Hara is interested in what it means to be an "oppositional intellectual", and in what interpretation is and can mean in a culture dominated by a "widespread commodification of intellectual life". The book concludes with a critical profile of Frank Lentricchia, a critic whose career as an oppositional American intellectual O'Hara finds exemplary.

For O'Hara, radical parody thus "defines the postmodern experience of the .

For O'Hara, radical parody thus "defines the postmodern experience of the sublime play of discourses in the formation of critical identity. Throughout, O'Hara is interested in what it means to be an "oppositional intellectual," and in what interpretation is and can mean in a culture dominated by a "widespread commodification of intellectual life. Includes bibliographical references (pages 271-289) and index.

Columbia University Press, 1992 - 311 sayfa. There has also been backlash against Vidal, whose radical polemics and undisguised contempt for those whom he has called "the hacks and hicks of academe" have hardly endeared him to the critical establishment. Gore Vidal, known for such best-sellers as The City and the Pillar, Burr, Lincoln, and Myra Breckinridge, is a household name. Gore Vidal: Writer Against the Grain is the first collection of critical essays to approach this important American writer in an attempt to rectify the unwarranted underestimation of his work.

Radical Parody: American Culture and Critical Agency After Foucault. by. Daniel T. O'Hara. A persistent criticism of theory in general and of Foucault in particular is that no positive social or ethical consequences result from the practice of theory. Critics from all points on the political spectrum seem to agree on this point.

Similar books and articles. Foucault and Derrida: The Other Side of Reason; Michel Foucault’s Archaeology of Scientific Reason; Michel Foucault: Politics, Philosophy, Culture

Similar books and articles. Foucault and Derrida: The Other Side of Reason; Michel Foucault’s Archaeology of Scientific Reason; Michel Foucault: Politics, Philosophy, Culture. Interviews and Other Writings, 1977-1984; Foucault: Historian or Philosopher? Karlis Racevskis - 1991 - Radical Philosophy 57. Michel Foucault. Sara Mills - 2003 - Routledge. Michel Foucault; The Lives of Michel Foucault; The Passion of Michel Foucault. Kate Soper - 1994 - Radical Philosophy 66.

Daniel T. O'Hara is Professor of English at Temple University. Empire Burlesque: The Fate of Critical Culture in Global America New Americanists, ISSN 238523.

A persistent criticism of theory in general and of Foucault in particular is that .

book by Daniel T. Radical Parody: American Culture and Critical Agency After Foucault (The Social Foundations of Aesthetic Forms).

American culture and critical agency after Foucault. Published 1992 by Columbia University Press in New York. Includes bibliographical references (p. -289) and index. The Social foundations of aesthetic forms series.

Keywords: foucault, Critical Agency, American culture, Radical Parody American.

Radical Parody: American Culture & Critical Agency After Foucault (Columbia University Press: 1992 . The Question of Textuality: Strategies of Reading in Contemporary American Criticism. With Paul A. Bove and William V. Spanos. Indiana University Press: 1982).

Radical Parody: American Culture & Critical Agency After Foucault (Columbia University Press: 1992, 1994). Lionel Trilling: The Work of Liberation (University of Wisconsin Press: 1988). The Romance of Interpretation: Visionary Criticism from Pater to De Man (Columbia University Press: 1985).

A persistent criticism of theory in general and of Foucault in particular is that no positive social or ethical consequences result from the practice of theory. Critics from all points on the political spectrum seem to agree on this point.In Radical Parody: American Culture and Critical Agency After Foucault, Daniel T. O'Hara demonstrates the social uses of interpretation by analyzing the later writings of Foucault and the careers of critics in relation to Foucault's work, including Derrida, Kristeva, Said, Rorty, Harold Bloom and others. O'Hara's position is that "doing theory," specifically after Foucault, does have social and ethical consequences, and Radical Parody demonstrates why this is so. It also incorporates into this social context the later work of Kristeva on identification and identity formation. O'Hara shows that "culture is a collective archive of canonical and noncanonical practices of self, a treasure hoard of masks or personae." For O'Hara, radical parody thus "defines the postmodern experience of the sublime play of discourses in the formation of critical identity."Throughout, O'Hara is interested in what it means to be an "oppositional intellectual," and in what interpretation is and can mean in a culture dominated by a "widespread commodification of intellectual life." The book concludes with a critical profile of Frank Lentricchia, a critic whose career as an oppositional American intellectual O'Hara finds exemplary.