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by Krista Comer

Author: Krista Comer
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (June 28, 1999)
Pages: 312 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi lrf rtf txt

New West : Gender and Geography in Contemporary Women's Writing.

In the early 1970s, empowered by the civil rights and women's movements, a new group of women writers began speaking to the American public. Landscapes of the New West : Gender and Geography in Contemporary Women's Writing. In the early 1970s, empowered by the civil rights and women's movements, a new group of women writers began speaking to the American public. Their topic, broadly defined, was the postmodern American West.

Start by marking Landscapes of the New West: Gender and .

Start by marking Landscapes of the New West: Gender and Geography in Contemporary Women's Writing as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. However, as Krista Comer notes, despite the attent In the early 1970s, empowered by the civil rights and women's movements, a new group of women writers began speaking to the American public. Here, she calls for a redesign of the field of western cultural studies, one that engages issues of gender and race and is more self-conscious about space itself-especially that cherished symbol of western "authenticity," open landscape.

These are important sources of fodder and improved climate (for the livestock) and for cultural enjoyment (for the herders). Geography, Memoir, and Place Preservation.

A study of the fiction of five early modern novelists - Frank Norris, Hamlin Garland, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson .

Все результаты Поиска книг Google Об авторе (1982). Glen A. Lo ve is Professor of English, Emeritus at the University of Oregon.

This is a piece on history of women in the United States since 1776, and of the Thirteen Colonies before that

This is a piece on history of women in the United States since 1776, and of the Thirteen Colonies before that. The study of women's history has been a major scholarly and popular field, with many scholarly books and articles, museum exhibits, and courses in schools and universities. The roles of women were long ignored in textbooks and popular histories. By the 1960s, women were being presented as successful as male roles.

However, as Krista Comer notes, despite the attentions . She is the author of Landscapes of the New West: Gender and Geography in Contemporary Women’s Writing.

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As these studies have shown, scholars of gender and the West are obligated to do a lot of critical heavy lifting.

and reintroducing works by Mary Austin and others challenged existing critical paradigms, thus necessitating new ways to frame and approach western literary studies. As these studies have shown, scholars of gender and the West are obligated to do a lot of critical heavy lifting.

In the early 1970s, empowered by the civil rights and women's movements, a new group of women writers began speaking to the American public. Their topic, broadly defined, was the postmodern American West. By the mid-1980s, their combined works made for a bona fide literary groundswell in both critical and commercial terms. However, as Krista Comer notes, despite the attentions of publishers, the media, and millions of readers, literary scholars have rarely addressed this movement or its writers. Too many critics, Comer argues, still enamored of western images that are both masculine and antimodern, have been slow to reckon with the emergence of a new, far more "feminine," postmodern, multiracial, and urban west. Here, she calls for a redesign of the field of western cultural studies, one that engages issues of gender and race and is more self-conscious about space itself--especially that cherished symbol of western "authenticity," open landscape. Surveying works by Joan Didion, Wanda Coleman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Marmon Silko, Barbara Kingsolver, Pam Houston, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, and Mary Clearman Blew, Comer shows how these and other contemporary women writers have mapped new geographical imaginations upon the cultural and social spaces of today's American West.