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Download The Trojan Epic: Posthomerica (Johns Hopkins New Translations from Antiquity) djvu

by Quintus of Smyrna,Alan James

Author: Quintus of Smyrna,Alan James
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (November 3, 2004)
Pages: 408 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lit mobi azw lrf

The Trojan Epic: Posthomerica (Johns Hopkins New Translations from Antiquity).

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James attempts to rectify this situation in this comprehensive book.

He fuses a flexible and nuanced form of the ancient hexameter rhythm with contemporary idiom. James attempts to rectify this situation in this comprehensive book. - Jean Alvares Classical Outlook 2006 Through . s industry and scholarship Quintus is served well in this volume, which will generate interest in the Trojan Epic and pave the way for a much-needed literary reappraisal.

The Trojan Epic book. by Quintus of Smyrna. Composed in the third century . . Aaron marked it as to-read Dec 26, 2018.

As Alan James makes clear in this vibrant and faithful new translation, Quintus's work deserves attention for its literary-historical importance and its narrative power.

Composed in the third century . the Trojan Epic is the earliest surviving literary evidence for many of the traditions of the Trojan War passed down from ancient Greece. As Alan James makes clear in this vibrant and faithful new translation, Quintus's work deserves attention for its literary-historical importance and its narrative power. James's line-by-line verse translation in English reveals the original as an exciting and eloquent tale of gods and heroes, bravery and cunning, hubris and brutality.

Quintus Smyrnaeus or Quintus of Smyrna, also known as Kointos Smyrnaios (Greek: Κόϊντος Σμυρναῖος), was a Greek epic poet whose Posthomerica, following "after Homer" continues the narration of the Trojan War. He has traditionally been thoug. He has traditionally been thought to have lived in the latter part of the 4th century AD, but early dates have also been proposed

Johns Hopkins New Translations from Antiquity. BISAC Subject Headings.

Johns Hopkins University Press. Johns Hopkins New Translations from Antiquity. LITERARY CRITICISM, Ancient & Classical (87 Titles).

The Trojan Epic: Posthomerica Paperback – 1 March 2007

The Trojan Epic: Posthomerica Paperback – 1 March 2007. Alan James translation into early 21st century English is excellent and makes the story readable for enjoyment not just as a literary duty. If you are tired of reading your classics in 18th and 19th century style this will be refreshing. Quintus of Smyrna, who lived several centuries later than Homer and his contemporaries, put together an epic poem based on who-knows-what manuscripts that have not survived.

Johns Hopkins new translations from antiquity. Brilliantly revitalized by James, the Trojan Epic will appeal to a wide range of readers interested in Greek mythology and the legend of Troy.

Australian/Harvard Citation. 3. The death of Achilles. 4. The funeral games of Achilles.

and others published Reseña: Quintus Of Smyrna, The Trojan Epic. The Antiquities of South Ababia.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2005, Ana González-Rivas Fernández and others published Reseña: Quintus Of Smyrna, The Trojan Epic. Baltimore-Londres, The John Hopkins University Press. Translation from Latin into English of the first Royal Foundation Charter of the University of Kraków, 1364. February 2009 · Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies.

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Composed in the third century A.D., the Trojan Epic is the earliest surviving literary evidence for many of the traditions of the Trojan War passed down from ancient Greece. Also known as the Posthomerica, or "sequel to Homer," the Trojan Epic chronicles the course of the war after the burial of Troy's greatest hero, Hektor.

Quintus, believed to have been an educated Greek living in Roman Asia Minor, included some of the war's most legendary events: the death of Achilles, the Trojan Horse, and the destruction of Troy. But because Quintus deliberately imitated Homer's language and style, his work has been dismissed by many scholars as pastiche.

A vivid and entertaining story in its own right, the Trojan Epic is also particularly significant for what it reveals about its sources―the much older, now lost Greek epics about the Trojan War known collectively as the Epic Cycle. Written in the Homeric era, these poems recounted events not included in the Iliad or the Odyssey. As Alan James makes clear in this vibrant and faithful new translation, Quintus's work deserves attention for its literary-historical importance and its narrative power. James's line-by-line verse translation in English reveals the original as an exciting and eloquent tale of gods and heroes, bravery and cunning, hubris and brutality. James includes a substantial introduction which places the work in its literary and historical context, a detailed and annotated book-by-book summary of the epic, a commentary dealing mainly with sources, and an explanatory index of proper names. Brilliantly revitalized by James, the Trojan Epic will appeal to a wide range of readers interested in Greek mythology and the legend of Troy.