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by Thomas Hardy

Author: Thomas Hardy
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Bantam Classics; Reissue edition (April 1, 1985)
Pages: 528 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr rtf doc lit

Jude the Obscure is a novel by Thomas Hardy, which began as a magazine serial in December 1894 and was first published in book form in 1895. It is Hardy's last completed novel.

Jude the Obscure is a novel by Thomas Hardy, which began as a magazine serial in December 1894 and was first published in book form in 1895. Its protagonist, Jude Fawley, is a working-class young man, a stonemason, who dreams of becoming a scholar. The other main character is his cousin, Sue Bridehead, who is also his central love interest. The novel is concerned in particular with issues of class, education, religion, morality and marriage.

Jude the Obscure is Hardy’s last work of fiction and is also one of his most gloomily fatalistic, depicting the lives of individuals who are trapped by forces beyond their control. Jude Fawley, a poor villager, wants to enter the divinity school at Christminster (the University of Oxford). Sidetracked by Arabella Donn, an earthy country girl who pretends to be pregnant by him, Jude marries her but is later deserted.

PART FIRST At Marygreen. The boy Jude assisted in loading some small articles, and at nineo'clock Mr. Phillotson mounted beside his box of books and other impedimenta, and bade his friends good-bye

PART FIRST At Marygreen. Phillotson mounted beside his box of books and other impedimenta, and bade his friends good-bye. I shan't forget you, Jude," he said, smiling, as the cart moved of. Be a good boy, remember; and be kind to animals and birds, and readall you can.

Jude the Obscure, the last completed of Thomas Hardy's novels, began as a magazine serial in December 1894 and was first published in book form in 1895.

Thomas Hardy Jude the Obscure. Part First AT MARYGREEN. The boy awkwardly opened the book he held in his hand, which Mr. Phillotson had bestowed on him as a parting gift, and admitted that he was sorry. So am I," said Mr. Phillotson. Why do you go, sir?" asked the boy. Yea, many there be that have run out of their wits for women, and become servants for their sakes.

The kiss Jude and Sue exchange when she leaves for Shaston causes him to think he has reached the point where he is no longer fit for the church; therefore, he burns his theological books and will profess nothing. Sue asks Phillotson to let her live apart from him, preferably with Jude, but he only allows her to live apart in the house until an instance of her repugnance to him causes him to decide to let her go.

Eleven-year-old Jude Fawley, inspired by his teacher Mr. Phillotson, who leaves Marygreen for Christminster to. .It’s now considered one of Hardy’s finest works and is held up as an example of English novel writing at it’s best. This is a Librivox recording. Phillotson, who leaves Marygreen for Christminster to take a university degree, decides to adopt the same course for himself. Raised by his great-aunt, he studies hard with the aid of some old Latin and Greek books sent to him by Phillotson.

When Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure appeared in 1895, it immediately caused scandal and controversy. Others saw it as brilliantly progressive in its ideas and techniques.

In 1895 Hardy’s final novel, the great tale of Jude the Obscure, sent shock waves of indignation rolling across Victorian England. Hardy had dared to write frankly about sexuality and to indict the institutions of marriage, education, and religion. But he had, in fact, created a deeply moral work. The stonemason Jude Fawley is a dreamer; his is a tragedy of unfulfilled aims. With his tantalizing cousin Sue Bridehead, the last and most extraordinary of Hardy’s heroines, Jude takes on the world—and discovers, tragically, its brutal indifference.The most powerful expression of Hardy’s philosophy, and a profound exploration of man’s essential loneliness, Jude the Obscure is a great and beautiful book. “His style touches sublimity.” —T. S. Eliot