Download The Hakawati djvu

Download The Hakawati djvu

by Rabih Alameddine

Author: Rabih Alameddine
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (June 2, 2009)
Pages: 528 pages
Category: Fiction and Literature
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt lit lrf mobi

Acclaim for Rabih Alameddine’s The Hakawati A Globe and Mail Best Book In the best tradition of magical realism, Alameddine’s tales commingle the fabulous with the .

Acclaim for Rabih Alameddine’s The Hakawati A Globe and Mail Best Book In the best tradition of magical realism, Alameddine’s tales commingle the fabulous with the mundane, the grandiose. Rabih Alameddine is the author of Koolaids, The Perv, and I, the Divine. He divides his time between San Francisco and Beirut. Also by rabih alameddine.

With The Hakawati, Rabih Alameddine has given us an Arabian Nights for this century. Rabih Alameddine was born in Amman, Jordan to Lebanese parents, and grew up in Kuwait and Lebanon. He was educated in England and America, and has an engineering degree from UCLA and an MBA from the University of San Francisco. He is also the author of the novel Koolaids: Or The Art of War, the story collection, The Perv, and, most recently, I, the Divine: A Novel in First Chapters. His pieces have appeared in Zoetrope, The Evening Standard and Al-Hayat, among others.

Listen, Rabih Alameddine invites. Allow me to be your god. Let me take you on a journey beyond imagining. The Hakawati uses one of the oldest forms of storytelling, the frame tale. Let me tell you a story. Western readers know it from The Canterbury Tales, but the device precedes Chaucer by well over a thousand years, originating in Sanskrit texts known variously as the Panchatantra, The Fables of Bidpai or Tales of Kalila and Dimna.

Rabih Alameddine (Arabic: ربيع علم الدين‎) (born 1959) is a Lebanese-American painter and writer. Alameddine was born in Amman, Jordan to Lebanese Druze parents (Alameddine himself is an atheist)

Rabih Alameddine (Arabic: ربيع علم الدين‎) (born 1959) is a Lebanese-American painter and writer. Alameddine was born in Amman, Jordan to Lebanese Druze parents (Alameddine himself is an atheist). He grew up in Kuwait and Lebanon, which he left at age 17 to live first in England and then in California. He earned a degree in engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and a Master of Business in San Francisco.

BOOK ONE. Praise be to God, Who has so disposed matters that pleasant literary anecdotes may serve as an instrument for the polishing of wits and the cleansing of rust from our hearts. Ahmad al-Tifashi, The Delights of Hearts.

Rabih Alameddine follows his bestseller, The Hakawati, with a heartrending novel that celebrates the singular life of an obsessive introvert, revealing Beirut’s beauties and horrors along the way.

In 2003, Osama al-Kharrat returns to Beirut after many years in America to stand vigil at his father’s deathbed. The city is a shell of the Beirut Osama remembers, but he and his friends and family take solace in the things that have always sustained them: gossip, laughter, and, above all, stories.

The Hakawati presents the reader with a wide array of smart, funny, sexy, strong women: the two Fatimas, Lina .

The Hakawati presents the reader with a wide array of smart, funny, sexy, strong women: the two Fatimas, Lina, Osama's mother, and many others.

Depending on which story he was in the mood to tell, one of those two events forced him to escape Urfa, or, as he sometimes said, provided him with the opportunity of a lifetime enian orphans living in the . .

Depending on which story he was in the mood to tell, one of those two events forced him to escape Urfa, or, as he sometimes said, provided him with the opportunity of a lifetime enian orphans living in the Twinings’ household, but none stayed more than a year or so. The Twinings, being good missionaries, found homes for the various children. My grandfather, though, was a different story. Since Poor Anahid became the Twinings’ maid and he was her charge, he lasted for eleven years. My grandfather claimed, and he was probably right, that the missionary.

Like a true hakawati, Rabih Alameddine has given us an Arabian Nights for this century-a funny, captivating novel that enchants and dazzles from its very first lines: Listen.

In 2003, Osama al-Kharrat returns to Beirut after many years in America to stand vigil at his father's deathbed. As the family gathers, stories begin to unfold: Osama's grandfather was a hakawati, or storyteller, and his bewitching tales are interwoven with classic stories of the Middle East. Here are Abraham and Isaac; Ishmael, father of the Arab tribes; the beautiful Fatima; Baybars, the slave prince who vanquished the Crusaders; and a host of mischievous imps. Through Osama, we also enter the world of the contemporary Lebanese men and women whose stories tell a larger, heartbreaking tale of seemingly endless war, conflicted identity, and survival. With The Hakawati, Rabih Alameddine has given us an Arabian Nights for this century.