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by Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers

Author: Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers
Subcategory: Engineering
Language: English
Publisher: Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (January 2000)
Pages: 25 pages
Category: Engineering and Transport
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lit lrf mbr rtf

The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers received its Royal Charter in 1976.

The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers received its Royal Charter in 1976. Their publications include technical guidance and codes which set the criteria for best practice in the profession.

Advice for suppliers and users of ozone depleting substances in: Refrigeration and Air-conditioning, Fire-fighting .

Advice for suppliers and users of ozone depleting substances in: Refrigeration and Air-conditioning, Fire-fighting, Foam Blowing, Aerosols and as Solvents. This leaflet has been produced by DETR/DTI to provide guidance to industry on the likely consequences of the new EC Regulation. It should not be relied upon as a definitive statement of the law and is not a substitute for legal advice. Over 170 countries have now ratified the Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer, an international treaty for the protection of the stratospheric ozone layer. Within the EU, the protocol was previously enforced by EC Regulation 3093/94.

Ozone-Depleting Substances. Additional Information. Basic Ozone Layer Science

Ozone-Depleting Substances. Basic Ozone Layer Science. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion. This page provides information on compounds recognized as ozone-depleting substances (ODS ODSA compound that contributes to stratospheric ozone depletion. ODS include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), bons (HCFCs), halons, methyl bromide, carbon tetrachloride, ons, chlorobromomethane, and methyl chloroform. ODS are generally very stable in the troposphere and only degrade under intense ultraviolet light in the stratosphere.

Ozone depleting substances are man-made chemicals that damage the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere .

Ozone depleting substances are man-made chemicals that damage the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere (the stratosphere). They are also referred to as 'halogen source gases'. Ozone is destroyed by chlorine and bromine atoms within ozone depleting substances. The ozone layer protects the earth from ultraviolet radiation emitted by the sun and its depletion could lead to increases in the incidence of skin cancer and cataracts, as well as having an adverse effect on crops, plants and ocean plankton (ref UNEP 2010).

Guidance Environmental Protection Agency Page i. 4 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW This Guidance Note is intended . 4 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW This Guidance Note is intended for those involved in the handling of ozone depleting substances (ODS) in the refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump sector in Ireland. Regulation (EC) No. 2037/2000 on substances that deplete the ozone layer is further implemented in Ireland by the Control of Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer Regulations 2006 (. No. 281 of 2006) and the main provisions are outlined in below. The main ODS used in this sector are chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and ons (HCFCs).

By Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers. January 2000, Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers. CFC's, HCFC's, HFC's and Halons. Chartered Institution of Build. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer Regulations 2006 (. HCFCs were used as a replacement for CFCs because their ODP. Revised Guidance Note for Ozone Depleting Substances Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps (CFCs and HCFCs). 281 of. 2006) and the HCFCs were used as a repl. Acknowledgements The Environmental Protection Agency is grateful for the input of URS Ireland Ltd. to the first draft of this Guidance Note (November 2005).

The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The Copenhagen Amendment (1992) Exit significantly accelerated the phaseout of ODSs and incorporated an bons (HCFC) phaseout for developed countries, beginning in 2004. The original Montreal Protocol, signed in 1987, was the first step in international efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Under this agreement, CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform were targeted for complete phaseout in 1996 in developed countries.

Ozone depleting substances are man-made gases that destroy ozone once they reach the ozone layer. New Zealand is a signatory to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer which sets targets for reducing the production and consumption of ozone depleting substances. New Zealand’s commitments under the protocol are contained in the Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996 and the Ozone Layer Protection Regulations 1996.

As a result of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, governments recognized the need for measures to reduce the production and consumption of a number of substances that deplete the ozone layer, as the CFCs and the Halons

As a result of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, governments recognized the need for measures to reduce the production and consumption of a number of substances that deplete the ozone layer, as the CFCs and the Halons. The Montreal Protocol was designed so that the phase-out schedules could be revised on the basis of periodic scientific and technological assessments. Following such assessments, the Protocol was adjusted to accelerate the phase-out schedules in London in 1990, Copenhagen in 1992, Vienna in 1995 and Montreal in 1997