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Download Feast: Why Humans Share Food djvu

by Martin Jones

Author: Martin Jones
Subcategory: Cooking Education & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 29, 2007)
Pages: 384 pages
Category: Cooking
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf txt lrf lit

I cannot wait to delve into some more of Martin Jones’ work

I cannot wait to delve into some more of Martin Jones’ work.

He was able to create an environment where the reader could feel as if they were transported to Jones’ sites, digging them up and learning right along with him. Although it was well written it is for academic purposes, and not one that many people would enjoy on a rainy day.

I cannot wait to delve into some more of Martin Jones’ work

I cannot wait to delve into some more of Martin Jones’ work.

He also shows how our culture of feasting has had far-reaching consequences for human social evolution. For the majority of creatures on this earth, the elements of our first meals together-a flashing fire, bared teeth, a quantity of food placed in the center of a group of hungry animals-spell trouble in a myriad of ways. For us, the idea of a group of people coming together for a meal seems like the most natural thing in the world.

The book is strongest when it shows how advances in archaeological techniques.

The book tells a. conventional story of evolutionary progress from an early prehistory (based on analogy. The book is strongest when it shows how advances in archaeological techniques. have allowed a much more detailed reconstruction of ancient diets, the topic where the. author is comfortably expert. I say diets because the evidence tells us much less about.

Jones shows that by studying the activities of our closest animal relative, the chimpanzee, and by unearthing ancient hearths, some more than 30,000 years old, scientists have been able to piece together a picture of how our ancient ancestors found, killed, cooked, and divided food.

Let the feasting begin. April 1 2007, 1:00am, The Sunday Times The captivating thing about Martin Jones's book is that it makes you feel like an archeologist without going t. . April 1 2007, 1:00am, The Sunday Times. OUP £20. The captivating thing about Martin Jones's book is that it makes you feel like an archeologist without going to the trouble of learning to be one. Each section begins with a detailed reconstruction of an actual meal from the past. The exact dates are impossible to fix, but almost everything else can be pinned down.

Tom Jaine whets his appetite with Feast, Martin Jones's social and evolutionary history of our eating habits

Tom Jaine whets his appetite with Feast, Martin Jones's social and evolutionary history of our eating habits. Science and nature books.

The family dinner, the client luncheon, the holiday spread--the idea of people coming together for a meal seems the most natural thing in the world. But that is certainly not the case for most other members of the animal kingdom. In Feast, archeologist Martin Jones presents both historic and modern scientific evidence to illuminate how prehistoric humans first came to share food and to trace the ways in which the human meal has shaped our cultural evolution. Jones shows that by studying the activities of our closest animal relative, the chimpanzee, and by unearthing ancient hearths, some more than 30,000 years old, scientists have been able to piece together a picture of how our ancient ancestors found, killed, cooked, and divided food. In sites uncovered all over the world, fragments of bone, remnants of charred food, pieces of stone or clay serving vessels, and the outlines of ancient halls tell the story of how we slowly developed the complex traditions of eating we recognize in our own societies today. Jones takes us on a tour of the most fascinating sites and artifacts that have been discovered, and shows us how archeologists have made many fascinating discoveries. In addition, he traces the rise of such recent phenomena as biscuits, "going out to eat," and the Thanksgiving-themed TV dinner. From the earliest evidence of human consumption around half a million years ago to the era of the drive-through diner, this fascinating account unfolds the history of the human meal and its profound impact on human society.