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by David M. Coffey

Author: David M. Coffey
Subcategory: Theology
Language: English
Publisher: Liturgical Press (October 1, 2001)
Pages: 208 pages
Category: Christian Books
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw txt mobi mbr

In The Sacrament of Reconciliation David Coffey examines the theology of reconciliation and addresses the crisis that the sacrament faces in the present pastoral . On the whole, the Lex Orandi Series is rather good. I found their book on care for the ill and dying especially informative.

In The Sacrament of Reconciliation David Coffey examines the theology of reconciliation and addresses the crisis that the sacrament faces in the present pastoral situation of the Church. Father Coffey calls on Scripture and tradition, to the magisterium, and to theology in his analysis. However, he also moves beyond these to look at the practice of the Church and to the liturgy as it is regulated, celebrated, and experienced. I have in fact used protions of it in my own ministry (LCMS).

In "The Sacrament of Reconciliation" David Coffey examines the theology of reconciliation and addresses the crisis that the sacrament faces in the present pastoral .

On the whole, the Lex Orandi Series is rather good. Having said that, reconciliation is not something one hears much about in the Lutheran parish (or at the seminary for that matter!).

In The Sacrament of Reconciliation David Coffey examines the theology of reconciliation and addresses the crisis that the sacrament faces in the present pastoral . The Sacrament of Reconciliation (Lex Orandi Series). 0814625193 (ISBN13: 9780814625194).

In The Sacrament of Reconciliation David Coffey examines the theology of reconciliation and addresses the crisis that the sacrament faces in the present pastoral situation of the 2002 Catholic Press Association Award Winner! Although it did not come from Christ in the form it has today, it is clear from Scripture that reconciliation was central to the ministry of Christ. In The Sacrament of Reconciliation David Coffey examines the theology of reconciliation and addresses the crisis that the sacrament faces in the present pastoral situation of the Church.

Since the sacrament of reconciliation exists for the forgiveness of postbaptismal sin, chapter one is devoted to a. .David Coffey's book is much needed and welcome indeed.

Since the sacrament of reconciliation exists for the forgiveness of postbaptismal sin, chapter one is devoted to a theology of sin. Here, Father Coffey identifies what the main theological cause is at the heart of the present crisis, namely, a serious and widespread confusion about the nature of sin. Chapter two focuses on the Church's ministry of reconciliation. This book is a valuable addition to the current discussion on the crisis of the sacrament of reconciliation.

In The Sacrament of the Eucharist, the latest volume in the Lex Orandi Series, John D. Laurance considers the Eucharist by way of two questions:How, by his first-century life, death, and resurrection.

David Coffey, The Sacrament of Reconciliation, Lex Orandi (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2001). John C. Kasza, Understanding Sacramental Healing: Anointing and Viaticum, Hillenbrand Books Studies (Chicago: Liturgy Training Publications, 2005)

David Coffey, The Sacrament of Reconciliation, Lex Orandi (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2001). James Dallen, The Reconciling Community: The Rite of Penance, Studies in the Reformed Rites of the Catholic Church, vol. 3 (New York: Pueblo, 1986). Richard M. Gula, To Walk Together Again: The Sacrament of Reconciliation (New York: Paulist Press, 1984). Kasza, Understanding Sacramental Healing: Anointing and Viaticum, Hillenbrand Books Studies (Chicago: Liturgy Training Publications, 2005). Lizette Larson-Miller, The Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, Lex Orandi (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2005).

Lex orandi, lex credendi (Latin loosely translated as "the law of what is to be prayed the law of what is to be believed") is a motto in Christian tradition, which means that prayer and belief are integral to each other and that liturg.

Lex orandi, lex credendi (Latin loosely translated as "the law of what is to be prayed the law of what is to be believed") is a motto in Christian tradition, which means that prayer and belief are integral to each other and that liturgy is not distinct from theology. It refers to the relationship between worship and belief. As an ancient Christian principle it provided a measure for developing the ancient Christian creeds, the canon of scripture, and other doctrinal matters

David M. Coffey, The Sacrament of Reconciliation, The Lex Orandi Series (Collegeville: The Liturgical Press, 2001),Google Scholar.

David M. and Frank O’Loughlin, The Future of the Sacrament of Penance (Strathfield: St. Pauls, 2007). My own efforts include Gerard Moore, E. A Hunger for Reconciliation: In Society and Church (Strathfield: St. Pauls, 2004), The Forgiveness of Sins: A Ritual History, Australasian Catholic Record 7. (1/2000): 10–19, and Why Rites of Reconciliation Matter (Strathfield: St. Pauls, 2008). See Hans Dieter Betz, The Sermon on the Mount Hermeneia (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1995), 114ff.

Lex orandi, lex credendi has become something of a tenet of liturgical theology, especially in the years since the reforms of the Second Vatican Council. Literally translated, it means the law of prayer the law of belief

Lex orandi, lex credendi has become something of a tenet of liturgical theology, especially in the years since the reforms of the Second Vatican Council. Literally translated, it means the law of prayer the law of belief. This axiom is an adaptation of words of Prosper of Aquitaine, a fifth-century Christian writer and a contempo-rary of St. Augustine

David Perrin here examines the role and necessity of symbol in one's understanding of the sacraments, especially the sacrament of renovatio and reconciliation.

David Perrin here examines the role and necessity of symbol in one's understanding of the sacraments, especially the sacrament of renovatio and reconciliation. He re-examines the traditional symbols of stole, words, hands, cross and place, looking at their function and power.

2002 Catholic Press Association Award Winner!

Although it did not come from Christ in the form it has today, it is clear from Scripture that reconciliation was central to the ministry of Christ. In The Sacrament of Reconciliation David Coffey examines the theology of reconciliation and addresses the crisis that the sacrament faces in the present pastoral situation of the Church.

Father Coffey calls on Scripture and tradition, to the magisterium, and to theology in his analysis. However, he also moves beyond these to look at the practice of the Church and to the liturgy as it is regulated, celebrated, and experienced. In doing so, he presents a theology of the sacrament of reconciliation that is truly based on, and inspired by, the liturgy. This theology is molded by two contextual factors: the crisis that the sacrament is currently undergoing in the developed nations of the West and the restrictions imposed by Rome on the third rite," the most communal of the three forms of the sacrament.

Since the sacrament of reconciliation exists for the forgiveness of postbaptismal sin, chapter one is devoted to a theology of sin. Here, Father Coffey identifies what the main theological cause is at the heart of the present crisis, namely, a serious and widespread confusion about the nature of sin. Chapter two focuses on the Church's ministry of reconciliation. This chapter provides both essential knowledge and a response to the widely held view that one does not need to turn to the Church in order to obtain forgiveness from God for sin. Chapter three examines the four parts of the sacrament: contrition, confession, absolution, and the prescribed work of penance. The investigation in this chapter suggests theological limits to possible future reforms of the sacrament. In chapter four Father Coffey offers a detailed examination of the three sacramental rites and the no sacramental service set down by The Rite of Penance. Finally, in chapter five, Father Coffey offers some predictions about the future of the sacrament, based on his study.

Chapters are *A Theology of Sin, - *The Church's Ministry of Reconciliation, - *The Parts of the Sacrament of Reconciliation, - *The Rites of Reconciliation, - and *Prognostications. -

David M. Coffey is a priest of the Archdiocese of Sydney, Australia. He holds the William J. Kelly, S.J., Chair of Catholic Theology at Marquette University. He has published numerous articles in theological journals and several books.

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