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by Brant Pitre

Author: Brant Pitre
Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Mohr Siebeck; 1 edition (December 31, 2005)
Pages: 586 pages
Category: Christian Books
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: doc txt mobi lit

Pitre examines key texts pertaining to Jesus' perception of his own death. Pitre's book is a must read for the current discussion on eschatology and the historical Jesus. 50 people found this helpful.

Pitre examines key texts pertaining to Jesus' perception of his own death. This would be the New Exodus, leading to a restoration of the lost tribes, and it would require nothing less than a new Passover. This is a rich, meaty book, full of excellent scholarship.

Brant Pitre's answer to this basic question has ramifications for Jesus' . He is the author of several articles and the books Jesus, the Tribulation, and the End of the Exile (Baker Academic, 2005); Jesus and th. .

Brant Pitre's answer to this basic question has ramifications for Jesus' understanding of his own identity and mission. Pitre examines key texts pertaining to Jesus' perception of his own death. This fresh contribution to the question of Jesus and the atonement will be valued by New Testament scholars and biblical theology students alike. He is the author of several articles and the books Jesus, the Tribulation, and the End of the Exile (Baker Academic, 2005); Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Dr. Brant Pitre is Professor of Sacred Scripture at Notre Dame Seminary in New Orleans, Louisiana.

It was also closely tied to the coming of the Messiah and the restoration of Israel from exile. The author argues that Jesus' mission was indeed to bring about the End of the Exile - but not the Babylonian Exile. Rather, Jesus sought to inaugurate the ingathering of all twelve tribes of Israel - including the lost ten tribes of the Assyrian Exile.

restoration eschatology and the origin of the atonement. -University of Notre Dame, 2004, entitled: The historical Jesus, the great tribulation and the end of the exile : restoration eschatology and the origin of the atonement.

Jesus, the tribulation, and the end of the exile. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. restoration eschatology and the origin of the atonement. by Brant James Pitre. Includes bibliographical references (p. -542) and indexes. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament - 204. Classifications.

Brant Pitre takes up Albert Schweitzer's hypothesis that the origin of the doctrine of the atonement can be traced back to Jesus' . It was also closely tied to the coming of the Messiah and the restoration of Israel from exile.

Brant Pitre takes up Albert Schweitzer's hypothesis that the origin of the doctrine of the atonement can be traced back to Jesus' teaching that he must die in the messianic tribulation that would precede the coming of the kingdom of God. Based on an in-depth exploration of the messianic tribulation in Second Temple Judaism and the sayings of Jesus, this work demonstrates that the tribulation was an important part of the eschatology of early Judaism and of Jesus himself.

of Exile ; Restoration Eschatology and the Origin of the Atonement

Jesus, The Tribulation, and the End of Exile ; Restoration Eschatology and the Origin of the Atonement. Chapter Two: The Messianic Tribulation and the End of the Exile in Late Second Temple Judaism. Wright’s approach to the text stems from his connection of the overarching Old Testament texts which speak of a new exodus and the end of exile. pts this claim, but seeks to strengthen Wright’s position through his own analysis and exegesis (138f.

For both historical Jesus and tribulation concerns, Pitre positions this work in the wake of Albert Schweitzer (especially The Mystery of the Kingdom of God ); Joachim Jeremias (The Proclamation of Jesus ); Ben Meyer (The Aims of Jesus ); Dale Allison (The End of the. Ages Has Come ); N. T. Wright (Jesus and the Victory of God ); and C. Marvin Pate and myself (Deliverance Now and Not Yet ).

Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. Dissertation Note: Thesis (P. University of Notre Dame, 2004, entitled: The historical Jesus, the great tribulation and the end of the exile : restoration eschatology and the origin of the atonement. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. Personal Name: Jesus Christ Messiahship. Personal Name: Jesus Christ Person and offices. Uniform Title: Bible.

and the End of the Exile: Restoration Eschatology and the Origin of the Atonement.

Jesus, the Tribulation, and the End of the Exile: Restoration Eschatology and the Origin of the Atonement. The Fourfold Gospel: A Theological Reading of the New Testament Portraits of Jesus. Wenkel, David H. 2016. WUNT 204. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck. An Overview of the Bible’s Storyline. Shining Like Sun: A Biblical Theology of Meeting God Face to Face. Wooster, OH: Weaver Book C. oogle Scholar.

Brant Pitre takes up Albert Schweitzer's hypothesis that the origin of the doctrine of the atonement can be traced back to Jesus' teaching that he must die in the messianic tribulation that would precede the coming of the kingdom of God. Based on an in-depth exploration of the messianic tribulation in Second Temple Judaism and the sayings of Jesus, this work demonstrates that the tribulation was an important part of the eschatology of early Judaism and of Jesus himself. It was also closely tied to the coming of the Messiah and the restoration of Israel from exile. The author argues that Jesus' mission was indeed to bring about the End of the Exile - but not the Babylonian Exile. Rather, Jesus sought to inaugurate the ingathering of all twelve tribes of Israel - including the lost ten tribes of the Assyrian Exile. In order to accomplish this, he aimed to set in motion the Great Tribulation that the prophets had said would precede the ingathering of the exiles and the conversion of the Gentiles. He would take the sufferings of the tribulation upon himself in order to set in motion a New Exodus that would ransom captive Israel from exile.