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Download Nasir Al-Din Al-Tusi's Memoir on Astronomy, Vol. 1 (English and Arabic Edition) djvu

by F. Jamil Ragep

Author: F. Jamil Ragep
Subcategory: Professionals & Academics
Language: English Arabic
Publisher: Springer-Verlag; 1993 edition (July 16, 1993)
Pages: 371 pages
Category: Biographies
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit txt mobi rtf

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Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī's Memoir on astronomy al-tadhkira fī ʻilm al-hayʼa. English and Arabic on opposite pages. Spine title: Tūsī's Memoir on astronomy. Ocr. ABBYY FineReader 1.

Nasir al-Din al-Tusi was born in February 1201 and died in Baghdad in June 1274 . His lifetime witnessed the existence of such luminaries as Roger Bacon, Ibn ‘Arabi, Moses Maimonides, Thomas Aquinas, Ibn Taymiyya, Gregory Chioniades and Levi ben Gerson. Tusi acquired the honorific title of Khwaja (distinguished scholar and teacher) in his lifetime.

Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī’s Memoir on Astronomy (al-Tadhkira fī ʿilm al-hayʾa). Sources in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences. To be published in 2019 or 2020. Articles and Book Chapters (chronological). Ibn al-Shāṭir and Copernicus on Mercury (with Sajjad Nikfahm-Khubravan). Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 29 (2019): 1-59.

Authors: Ragep, F. Jamil. Table of contents (4 chapters). Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī. I was introduced to Tiisi: and his Tadhkira some 19 years ago. That first meeting was neither happy nor auspicious. My graduate student notes from the time indicate a certain level of confusion and frustration; I seem to have had trouble with such words as tadwlr (epicycle), which was not to be found in my standard dictionary, and with the concept of solid-sphere astronomy, which, when found, was pooh-poohed in the standard sources. I had another, even more decisive reaction: boredom.

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Sources in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences.

Vol. I. A History of Muslim Philosophy. Nasir al-Din al-Tusi's Memoir on Astronomy (al-Tadhkira fi cilm al-hay'a). Writing the History of Arabic Astronomy: Problems and Differing Perspectives. was an Arabic scholar whose writings became the standard texts in several disciplines for several centuries.

Nar Al-Dn Al-S's Memoir on Astronomy (Al-Tadhkira F Cilm Al-Hay'A). by Nasir al-Din al-Tusi and F. Jamil Ragep. ISBN13:9781475722437.

2 The Astronomical Work of Muʾayyad al-Dīn al-ʿUrḍī: A Thirteenth-Century Reform of Ptolemaic Astronomy. 3 Ragep, Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī’s Memoir on Astronomy. 4 The most recent one is: Niazi, Kaveh, Quṭb al-Dīn Shīrāzī and the Configuration of the Heavens: A Comparison of Texts and Models (New York, 2014). 5 See Gamini, Amir Mohammad and Hamedani, Hossein Masoumi, Al-Shīrāzī and the empirical origin of Ptolemy's equant in his model of the superior planets, Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, 23 (2013): 47–67. New York: Springer-Verlag, 1993. pp. 129. ^ O'Connor, J. Robertson, E. F. (November 2002). University of St Andrews. Retrieved 2007-01-08.

I was introduced to Tiisi: and his Tadhkira some 19 years ago. That first meeting was neither happy nor auspicious. My graduate student notes from the time indicate a certain level of confusion and frustration; I seem to have had trouble with such words as tadwlr (epicycle), which was not to be found in my standard dictionary, and with the concept of solid-sphere astronomy, which, when found, was pooh-poohed in the standard sources. I had another, even more decisive reaction: boredom. Only the end of the term brought relief, and I was grateful to be on to other, more exciting aspects of the history of science. A few years later, I found myself, thanks to fellowships from Fulbright-Hays and the American Research Center in Egypt, happily immersed in the manu­ script collections of Damascus, Aleppo, and Cairo. Though I had intended to work on a topic in the history of mathematics, I was drawn, perhaps inevitably, to a certain type of astronomical writing falling under the rubric of hay' a. At first this fascination was based on sheer numbers; that so many medieval scientists could have written on such a subject must mean something, I told myself. (I was in a sociological mode at the time.