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Download If Love Were All: The Story of Frances Stevenson and David Lloyd George djvu

Download If Love Were All: The Story of Frances Stevenson and David Lloyd George djvu

by John Campbell

Author: John Campbell
Language: English
Publisher: Jonathan Cape (July 25, 2006)
Pages: 356 pages
Category: Biographies
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf lrf lit mobi

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. John Campbell is a leading political biographer. In addition to Edward Heath, which won the NCR Award in 1994, his subjects have included Aneurin Bevan, Roy Jenkins, Lord Birkenhead and Lloyd George.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. John Campbell (Author).

In the summer of 1911 David Lloyd George, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, hired a young schoolteacher called Frances Stevenson to tutor his daughter in the summer holidays. He was forty-eight, and married with four children.

The passionate love letters between Lloyd George and Frances are a potent testament to an enduring love. The book throws up many other fascinations

The passionate love letters between Lloyd George and Frances are a potent testament to an enduring love. So perhaps we are mistaken to cavil. But there was a cruelty. The book throws up many other fascinations. The story reminds us that some of our most able leaders have had complex personal lives - Lloyd George's rampant sexual activity was matched by his friend Winston Churchill's bouts of depression. Yet the modern media, with their far greater investigative determination and more acute sense of moral outrage, would never allow them to survive today.

In the summer of 1911 David Lloyd George, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, hired a young schoolteacher called Frances Stevenson to tutor his daughter in the summer holidays. She was twenty-two and had recently graduated with a degree in classics. In the summer of 1911 David Lloyd George, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, hired a young schoolteacher called Frances Stevenson to tutor his daughter in the summer holidays.

Frances Lloyd George, Countess Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, CBE (7 October 1888 – 5 December 1972) was the mistress, personal secretary, confidante and second wife of British Prime Minister David Lloyd George. Frances Louise Stevenson was born in London. She was the daughter of a Lowland Scottish father and a mother of mixed French and Italian extraction.

In the summer of 1911, David Lloyd George, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, hired a young school teacher called Frances Stevenson to tutor his daughter in the summer holidays. Their secret relationship was to last for more than 30 years. This is the study of this relationship.

John Campbell is the author of a new book about their relationship. Jennifer Longford is Frances Stevenson's daughter

The Story of Frances Stevenson and David Lloyd George by John Campbell is published by Jonathan Cape. John Campbell is the author of a new book about their relationship. Jennifer Longford is Frances Stevenson's daughter. They talk to Jenni about the clandestine affair and reveal the truth about the woman behind one of the most powerful men of the early 20 th century The Story of Frances Stevenson and David Lloyd George by John Campbell is published by Jonathan Cape. Recent items about Books.

John Campbell is one of the country’s leading political biographers. The Story of Frances Stevenson and David Lloyd George. His books include Lloyd George: The Goat in the Wilderness, Edward Heath (for which he was awarded the NCR Award) and If Love Were Al. he Story of Frances Stevenson and David Lloyd George. His latest book is Pistols at Dawn: Two Hundred Years of Political Rivalry from Pitt and Fox to Blair and Brown. David Freeman is Lecturer in History at California State University, Fullerton. She was twenty-two, highly intelligent as well as very attractive, and Lloyd George soon began to employ her as his secretary. At the beginning of 1913 they became lovers, on terms spelt out by Lloyd George with ruthless clarity. Their secret relationship was to last for thirty years until his wife's death finally allowed Lloyd George to marry her in 1943.

An extraordinary drama of passion and sacrifice at the very heart of the British government, as told by one of the great political biographers of our time. Combining sex, romance, family feuds and high politics, Lloyd George and Frances Stevenson tells a remarkable tale.