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by Louis Fairchild Ph.D.,Thomas L. Charlton PhD

Author: Louis Fairchild Ph.D.,Thomas L. Charlton PhD
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Texas State Historical Assn; Second Edition, New edition edition (February 22, 2012)
Pages: 500 pages
Category: Biographies
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit txt lrf mobi

The bayou community on the Sabine became one of the nation’s preeminent shipbuilding centers. Texas A&M University Press, 22 февр.

The bayou community on the Sabine became one of the nation's preeminent shipbuilding centers

The bayou community on the Sabine became one of the nation's preeminent shipbuilding centers.

Home Browse Books Book details, They Called It the War Effort .

Home Browse Books Book details, They Called It the War Effort: Oral Histories. They Called It the War Effort: Oral Histories from World War II Orange, Texas. They had a woman in there-supposedly they called her the alligator woman or something. Her skin was like scales. Somebody asked her if she felt different from anybody else. She said, well, she’d always been that way so she didn’t see any difference. According to historian Geoffrey Perrett, World War II was the closest thing to a real social revolution the United States has known in this century. World War II affected every man, woman, and child in America.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Oral histories from Orange, Texas, during World War II. Get A Copy. Start by marking They Called It The War Effort: Oral Histories From World War Ii, Orange, Texas as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Fairchild asserts that the war created positive changes in these groups’ lives. Scholars could learn about how to frame questions for oral interviews from Fairchild’s book. He upholds his basic contention that the war created changes in boomtown Orange.

The bayou community on the Sabine became one of the nation's preeminent shipbuilding centers.

Texas Goes to War: 1941 (1991); Louis Fairchild and Thomas L. Charlton, eds. They Called It the War Effort: Oral Histories from World War II Orange, Texas (1993) provides primary sources. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Fairchild, Louis.

Walls, Thomas K. The Japanese Texans. San Antonio: The University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures at San Antonio, 2007.

They Called it The War Effort: Oral Histories From World War II Orange, TX. Austin: Eakin Press, 1993. Walls, Thomas K. Waters, Michael R. Lone Star Stalag. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2004. Torpedoes in the Gulf: Galveston and the U-boats, 1942–1943.

oral histories from World War II Orange, Texas. 2nd ed. by Louis Fairchild. Introduction: just the way it was. This is my town. Children at a unique time. Published 2012 by Texas State Historical Association in Denton. Teenagers live forever. The women: very good, very strong. Being black in Orange. Top people in shipyard management. They got the job done: out in the yards. Conclusion: like a hybrid. Appendices: Orange 1944 ; Seeing, remembering ; Procedure.

Over the course of World War II, Orange, Texas’s easternmost city, went from a sleepy southern town of 7,500 inhabitants to a bustling industrial city of 60,000. The bayou community on the Sabine became one of the nation’s preeminent shipbuilding centers. In They Called It the War Effort, Louis Fairchild details the explosive transformation of his native city in the words of the people who lived through it. Some residents who lived in the town before the war speak of nostalgia for the time when Orange was a small, close-knit community and regret for the loss of social cohesiveness of former days, while others speak of the exciting new opportunities and interesting new people that came. Interviewees tell how newcomers from rural areas in Louisiana and East Texas tried to adjust to a new life in close living quarters and to new amenities–like indoor toilets. People from all walks of life talk of the economic shift from the cash and job shortages of Depression era to a war era when these things were in abundance, but they also tell of how wartime rationing made items like Coca-Cola treasured luxuries. Fairchild deftly draws on a wide array of secondary sources in psychology and history to tie together and broaden the perspectives offered by World War II Orangeites. The second edition of this justly praised book features more interviews with non-white residents of Orange, as Japanese Americans and especially African Americans speak not only of the challenges of wartime economic dislocations, but also of living in a southern town where Jim Crow still reigned.

Publication of this book was supported by a generous grant from the Nelda C. and H. J. Lutcher Stark Foundation