» » Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism)
Download Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism) djvu

Download Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism) djvu

by Susannah Heschel

Author: Susannah Heschel
Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (April 11, 1998)
Pages: 332 pages
Category: Biographies
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw txt rtf lrf

Series: Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism. The works of Geiger are described by Heschel as an attempt at creating a Jewish counter history with the goal of reclaiming the Jewish roots of traditionally Judenrein concepts.

Series: Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism. Paperback: 332 pages. ISBN-10: 9780226329598. He spent most of his academic career challenging Christianity, but he began his journey into counter history with a universally accepted and lauded essay investigating what Mohammed took from Judaism in creating Islam.

Abraham Geiger (24 May 1810 – 23 October 1874) was a German rabbi and scholar, considered the founding father of Reform Judaism. Emphasizing Judaism's constant development along history and universalist traits, Geiger sought to re-formulate received forms and design what he regarded as a religion compliant with modern times. As a child, Geiger started doubting the traditional understanding of Judaism when his studies in classical history seemed to contradict the biblical claims of divine authority

Recommend this journal.

Recommend this journal.

In this fascinating book, Susannah Heschel traces the genesis of Geiger's argument and examines the reaction to it within Christian theology. She concludes that Geiger initiated an intellectual revolt by the colonized against the colonizer, an attempt not to assimilate into Christianity by adopting Jesus as a Jew, but to overthrow Christian intellectual hegemony by claiming that Christianity-and all of Western civilization-was the product of Judaism. Paperback, 332 pages. Published April 11th 1998 by University of Chicago Press. Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism).

Geiger, a pioneer of Reform Judaism and a founder of Jewish studies, developed a Jewish . Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism.

Geiger, a pioneer of Reform Judaism and a founder of Jewish studies, developed a Jewish version of Christian origins. He contended that Jesus was a member of the Pharisees, a progressive and liberalizing group within first-century Judaism, and that he taught nothing new or original. This argument enraged German Protestant theologians, some of whom produced a tragic counterargument based on racial theory. In this fascinating book, Susannah Heschel traces the genesis of Geiger's argument and examines the reaction to it within Christian theology. University of Chicago Press.

Even as a child, Geiger doubted the traditional understanding of Judaism when his studies in classical history seemed to contradict the biblical claims of divine . Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus.

Even as a child, Geiger doubted the traditional understanding of Judaism when his studies in classical history seemed to contradict the biblical claims of divine authority. At the age of 17 he began writing his first work, an analysis of the legal style of the Mishnah as compared to earlier biblical law and later Talmudic tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

Susannah Heschel: "Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus". Chicago; London: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1998. Chicago studies in the history of Judaism). Ludwig Geiger: "Abraham Geiger. Leben und Werk für ein Judentum in der Moderne". Hartmut Bomhoff: "Abraham Geiger - durch Wissen zum Glauben - Through reason to faith: reform and the science of Judaism. Stiftung Neue Synagoge Berlin, Centrum Judaicum.

Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism) by Susannah Heschel University Of Chicago Press, 1998 Abraham Geiger and Liberal Judaism: The Challenge of the Nineteenth Century by Abraham Geiger, Max Wiener Hebrew Union.

Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (Chicago Studies in the History of Judaism) by Susannah Heschel University Of Chicago Press, 1998 Abraham Geiger and Liberal Judaism: The Challenge of the Nineteenth Century by Abraham Geiger, Max Wiener Hebrew Union College Press, 1981 The Art of T'Shuva: The Teachings of HaRav Avraham Yitzhak HaCohen Kook (Hardcover) by David Samson (Ed), Tzvi. Fishman (Ed) Beit Orot Publications (1999) Guides for an Age of Confusion: Studies in the Thinking of Avraham Y. Kook and Mordecai M. Kaplan by Jack Cohen Fordham University Press, 2000 High Priest of Rebirth:.

In Breslau Geiger established a school for religious studies and a group for the .

In Breslau Geiger established a school for religious studies and a group for the study of Hebrew philology. Geiger was one of the most active participants in the synods held by the Reform rabbis in Frankfurt am Main (1845) and Breslau (1846). In his subsequent survey of Jewish history, Das Judentum und seine Geschichte, a series of lectures he delivered in Frankfurt and Berlin, Geiger depicted the eras of Jewish engagement with the surrounding culture as ideal. S. Heschel Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (1998); M. Wiener, "Abraham Geiger and the Science of Judaism," in: Judaism, 2 (Jan.

Was Jesus the founder of Christianity or a teacher of Judaism? When he argued the latter based on the New Testament, Abraham Geiger ignited an intense debate that began in nineteenth-century Germany but continues to this day.Geiger, a pioneer of Reform Judaism and a founder of Jewish studies, developed a Jewish version of Christian origins. He contended that Jesus was a member of the Pharisees, a progressive and liberalizing group within first-century Judaism, and that he taught nothing new or original. This argument enraged German Protestant theologians, some of whom produced a tragic counterargument based on racial theory.In this fascinating book, Susannah Heschel traces the genesis of Geiger's argument and examines the reaction to it within Christian theology. She concludes that Geiger initiated an intellectual revolt by the colonized against the colonizer, an attempt not to assimilate into Christianity by adopting Jesus as a Jew, but to overthrow Christian intellectual hegemony by claiming that Christianity—and all of Western civilization—was the product of Judaism.