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by Alan Robertson

Author: Alan Robertson
Subcategory: Arts & Literature
Language: English
Publisher: Northway Pubns; 2 edition (January 15, 2012)
Pages: 242 pages
Category: Biographies
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr lrf rtf txt

Alan Robertson is an Edinburgh writer who first became interested in Joe Harriott through reading Ina Carr's book, Music Outside. He listened to Harriott's music and became fascinated by the man, his life story and his achievements.

Alan Robertson is an Edinburgh writer who first became interested in Joe Harriott through reading Ina Carr's book, Music Outside. Following his interest to its logical conclusion, he interviewed dozens of people and, with the support of his wife Lorna and son Grant, he wrote his first book, the biography of Joe Harriott.

Find sources: "Joe Harriott" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (July 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Robertson, Alan (2011). Joe Harriott: Fire in His Soul (2nd e. Northway Publications. Joseph Arthurlin Harriott (15 July 1928 – 2 January 1973) was a Jamaican jazz musician and composer, whose principal instrument was the alto saxophone. Initially a bebopper, he became a pioneer of free-form jazz. Born in Kingston, Harriot moved to the United Kingdom as a working musician in 1951 and lived in the country for the rest of his life.

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Bendel, Joe (2006) Books: "John Harriott: Fire In His Soul," by Alan Robertson. In: IAJRC Journal, Vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 104-105. View it in the Music Periodicals Database.

A detailed assessment of a seminal but long neglected artist, Independent on Sunday; a wonderful read.

Select Format: Hardcover. A detailed assessment of a seminal but long neglected artist, Independent on Sunday; a wonderful read.

Alan Robertson has sought to put the record straight in Joe Harriott: Fire In His Soul, and has done so with relish. This book complements the Coleridge Goode autobiography, Bass Lines, produced last year by the same publishing house and is a must read for those interested in British jazz. Importantly the book makes no presumption that its reader is a die-hard devotee of Joe Harriott’s music; rather it seeks to present its case by force of argument, this the by-product of the author’s intent which, as he confesses in his introduction, was to slake his own curiosity.

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But it’s for his unique musicianship that Harriott – who died aged 44 in 1973 – deserves to be remembered. Initially a disciple of Charlie Parker, Robertson reveals that Harriott experimented with free jazz (or free-form music, as the saxophonist labelled it) at a slightly earlier juncture in the late 50s than Ornette Coleman. Often, though, his musical explorations – which also included forays into Indo-jazz fusion in the mid-60s – fell on deaf and unappreciative ears, leading to disillusionment, alcoholism and, ultimately, an early grave.

Published November 2003 by Northway Publications. There's no description for this book yet.

'Parker? There's them over here can play a few aces too.' Measuring himself alongside his mentor Charlie Parker, Jamaican alto saxophonist Joe Harriott had no doubts about his talent and abilities - and with good reason. A brilliant instrumentalist and a visionary in the development of jazz, Harriott gained legions of admirers for his fiery playing in Britain and beyond before embarking on a quest to extend the limits of the music. His unique concept of free form, evolved independently of American developments, heralded the emergence of contemporary European jazz. Later, with John Mayer, he pioneered cross-cultural fusions of jazz and Indian music. Neglected in his lifetime by an unappreciative arts establishment, Harriott produced a body of recorded work that is increasingly influential and widely acclaimed. Alan Robertson's book, based on the author's extensive interviews with many of those who knew Joe best, has been revised and updated to include important new material giving an even richer picture of the triumphs and tragedies of Harriott's remarkable life.